Archive for the ‘ban’ Category

Total Cell Phone Ban in Cars?

January 12, 2009

This should be a “no-brainer.”  Experts day driving while using a cell phone is about the same as driving drunk.

But no-brainers of the world still insist upon doing both…and fight for their right to do so….

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Eveybody knows drinking and driving is a no-no. Now, a national safety group wants to get us to look at using cell phones while driving in the same way.

The National Safety Council is calling for a total ban on cell phone use while driving. And the council wants the ban to include the use of hands-free attachments.

Ninety percent of the nation's 300 million residents have cell phone accounts, CTIA says.

Ninety percent of the nation’s 300 million residents have cell phone accounts, CTIA says.

It’s the first time the group has taken such a position. The council’s head, Janet Froetscher, says using a cell phone behind the wheel makes the risk of having a crash four times greater than for those who don’t call and drive.

She says people have gotten used to the idea of taking the car keys away from those who have been drinking and it’s now “time to take the cell phone away.”

No state currently bans all cell phone use while driving. However, six states and the District of Columbia forbid the use of hand-held cell phones behind the wheel.

On the Net:
National Safety Council site:
http://www.nsc.org/resources/issues/distracted–driving.aspx

CTIA-The Wireless Association site:
http://www.ctia.org/

http://edition.cnn.com/2009/TECH/01/12/c
ell.phone.driving/index.html

Lye, Boric Acid Banned as Food Additives in China

December 15, 2008

Substances commonly used as industrial dyes, insecticides and drain cleaners were included on a list of illegal food additives China released Monday as part of a monthslong government crackdown aimed at improving the country’s shoddy food safety record.

Among the 17 banned substances was boric acid, commonly used as an insecticide, which is mixed with noodles and meatballs to increase elasticity, a statement posted on the Ministry of Health Web site said. Also forbidden was industrial formaldehyde and lye, used in making soap and drain cleaner and added to water used to soak some types of dried seafood to make the products appear fresher and bigger.

A scandal over melamine-tainted infant formula, which likely killed six babies and sickened 294,000 others earlier this year, prompted the government food safety campaign last week.

By ANITA CHANG, Associated Press Writer

Chinese police raid an unregulated meat processing shop in southwest ... 
Chinese police raid an unregulated meat processing shop in southwest China’s Chongqing Municipality Thursday, Dec. 11, 2008. China has launching a four-month food safety campaign that will include inspections of food makers to weed out illegal or excessive chemicals in food, in the country’s latest move to restore trust hurt by a tainted milk scandal.(AP Photo)

The list of banned substances was released by a government committee tasked with weeding out the practice of augmenting food products with nonfood additives. Local authorities were also warned to watch out for another 10 food additives that are often used excessively.

“This list provides clues for relevant departments as they carry out this campaign,” said the statement, adding that the list was not comprehensive.

The government had previously banned some of the 17 substances as separate scandals rocked the country and raised concerns over products such as milk and eggs, but the list released Monday appeared to mark the first attempt at compiling the information.

Also on the list were various industrial dyes that are added to improve the appearance of food products, ranging from chili powder to tea to cooked meats.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081215/ap_on_
re_as/as_china_tainted_products_2