Archive for the ‘blogging’ Category

Vietnam imposes new blogging restrictions

December 24, 2008

Vietnam has approved new regulations banning bloggers from discussing subjects the government deems sensitive or inappropriate and requiring them to limit their writings to personal issues.

Associated Press

The rules ban any posts that undermine national security, incite violence or crime, disclose state secrets, or include inaccurate information that could damage the reputation of individuals and organizations, according to a copy of the regulations obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press.

The rules, which were approved Dec. 18, attempt to rein in Vietnam’s booming blogosphere. It has become an alternative source of news for many in the communist country, where the media is state-controlled.

The new rules require Internet companies that provide blogging platforms to report to the government every six months and provide information about bloggers on request.

The companies are also required to prevent and remove content the government deems harmful.

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Read the rest:
http://tech.yahoo.com/news/ap/20081224
/ap_on_hi_te/as_vietnam_blog_restrictions_3

China defends censoring websites that break rules

December 16, 2008

China defended Tuesday the blocking of websites it said violated Chinese law and urged Internet companies to respect its legal system.

“The Chinese government conducts necessary management over the Internet. It is the same with other nations,” foreign ministry spokesman Liu Jianchao told journalists.

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Chinese journalists, Reporters Without Borders and Tibetan human rights groups all say China censors the internet too much…

“You cannot deny, some websites actually contain content that violates China’s laws.”

Liu cited websites that maintain that Taiwan is an independent nation separate from China, a view that violates China’s anti-secession law, he said.

“I hope that websites can practise self-restraint and not do things that violate China’s law,” he said.
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AFP

Liu was responding to questions on why websites belonging to the BBC, the Voice of America and Reporters Without Borders appeared to be blocked in China after they were made accessible during the Beijing Olympics.

Liu did not answer those questions, nor would he comment on the legal process leading up to the blocking of any particular website.

China exercises strict control over the Internet, blocking sites linked to Chinese dissidents, the outlawed Falun Gong spiritual movement, the Tibetan government-in-exile and those with information on the 1989 Tiananmen massacre.

Its system of Internet censorship has become known as the “Great Firewall of China” due to the large number of websites that are inaccessible from inside the country.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081216/tc_afp/chin
amediainternetcensorship_081216171844

Blogging dangerous for foreign journalists

December 5, 2008

Blogging can be a dangerous business.

More bloggers and online scribes have been jailed worldwide than any other breed of journalists, according to the  Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), which released its annual “prison census” survey Thursday.

Almost half — 45 percent — of all media workers jailed worldwide are bloggers, Web-based reporters or online editors, representing the largest professional category for the first time in CPJs prison census.

“Online journalism has changed the media landscape and the way we communicate with each other,” said CPJ Executive Director Joel Simon. “But the power and influence of this new generation of online journalists has captured the attention of repressive governments around the world, and they have accelerated their counterattack.”

The carefree existence of bloggers may be a myth — at least in some parts of the world.

By Jennifer Harper
The Washington Times 

“The image of the solitary blogger working at home in pajamas may be appealing, but when the knock comes on the door they are alone and vulnerable, said Mr. Simon.

The CPJ survey found that overall, 125 journalists are behind bars in 29 countries as of Dec. 1 — and 56 percent of them are bloggers, or work online. There was only one blogger jailed a decade ago.

Print reporters, editors and photographers make up the next largest category, with 53 incarcerated this year. Television and radio journalists and documentary filmmakers constitute the rest.

All of us must stand up for their rights — from Internet companies to journalists and press freedom groups. The future of journalism is online and we are now in a battle with the enemies of press freedom who are using imprisonment to define the limits of public discourse,” Mr. Simon said.

Related:
Vietnam court upholds blogger’s jail term

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008
/dec/04/blogging-dangerous-foreign-journalis
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