Archive for the ‘brutality’ Category

Most American Media Ignore Reasons Behind China-YouTube Debacle — BBC Has Stones

March 25, 2009

China pulled the plug on YouTube: cutting off 300 million Chinese viewers.

The issue is one of free speech and international access.

But it is also about censorship and control.  A video of Chinese police beating a Tibetan protester to death is at the heart of China’s new action.

Most U.S. media have only reported that China pulled the YouTube plug.  Nothing more.

That is a crime on top of a crime — so as not to rile China we suspect.

This allows China to restrict freedom of speech and to violate norms of human rights everywhere else….

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BBC

China’s move to block YouTube has been criticised by a leading advocacy group that promotes constitutional liberties in the digital age.

The Centre for Democracy and Technology told the BBC: “China’s actions fail to live up to international norms.”

The video sharing site has been off limits in China since Monday.

“China’s apparent blocking of YouTube is at odds with the rule of law and the right to freedom of expression,” said CDT president Leslie Harris.

“Anytime a country limits or takes down content online , it must be forthright and specific about its actions and do so only in narrowly defined circumstances consistent with international human rights and the rule of law,” stated Ms Harris.

Google, which owns YouTube, told the BBC that it had no idea why the Chinese government had taken this action.

“We don’t know the reason for the block and are working to restore access to users in China as quickly as possible,” said spokesperson Scott Rubin.

Tibet

Earlier in the week, the BBC reported from Beijing that China cut off access to the website because it carried a video showing soldiers beating monks and other Tibetans.

The graphic video was released by Tibetan exiles and showed hundreds of uniformed Chinese troops swarming through a Tibetan monastery. It included footage of a group of troops beating a man with batons.

Read the rest:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/te
chnology/7962718.stm

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Massacre Unfurls in Congo, Despite Nearby Support

December 11, 2008

At last the bullets had stopped, and François Kambere Siviri made a dash for the door. After hiding all night from firefights between rebels and a government-allied militia over this small but strategic town, he was desperate to get to the latrine a few feet away.

 

Michael Kamber for The New York Times

Muwavita Mukangusi’s husband was suspected by rebels of being part of a different militia. He was beaten and shot in the head.

“Pow, pow, pow,” said his widowed mother, Ludia Kavira Nzuva, recounting how the rebels killed her 25-year-old son just outside her front door. As they abandoned his bloodied corpse, she said, one turned to her and declared, “Voilà, here is your gift.”

In little more than 24 hours, at least 150 people would be dead, most of them young men, summarily executed by the rebels last month as they tightened their grip over parts of eastern Congo, according to witnesses and human-rights investigators.

And yet, as the killings took place, a contingent of about 100 United Nations peacekeepers was less than a mile away, struggling to understand what was happening outside the gates of its base. The peacekeepers were short of equipment and men, United Nations officials said, and they were focusing on evacuating frightened aid workers and searching for a foreign journalist who had been kidnapped. Already overwhelmed, officials said, they had no intelligence capabilities or even an interpreter who could speak the necessary languages.

The peacekeepers said they had no idea that the killings were taking place until it was all over.

The executions in Kiwanja are a study in the unfettered cruelty meted out by the armed groups fighting for power and resources in eastern Congo. But the events are also a textbook example of the continuing failure of the world’s largest international peacekeeping force, which has a mandate to protect the Congolese people from brutality.