Archive for the ‘church’ Category

What Church for Obama?

December 21, 2008

A Washington Post reporter said the newspaper had called 16 churches to see if they’d heard anything about the first family’s intended place of worship. The white churches responded, eager to share their lobbying efforts to win the Obamas as parishioners. The black churches didn’t respond; they didn’t want to play, said the reporter. “They don’t trust us,” she said, explaining that after the Rev. Jeremiah Wright experience, black church leaders think the media are waiting to descend on them looking for inflammatory sound bites, sifting through tapes and examining church bulletins for anything that might offend white America.

St. John’s Episcopal Church near the White House

Black religious leaders did not stand up for Wright even as they understood and sympathized with the prophetic theology he was steeped in. He had jeopardized Obama’s candidacy and so he disappeared, but the internal fight, much of it generational, continues. Wright has since eased himself back into Trinity Church in Chicago, alongside his successor, Otis Moss III, a voice of the future. The rise of Obama highlighted a cadre of black professionals who, like Obama, were not shaped by the civil-rights battles of the ’60s, or steeped in family memories of slavery and Jim Crow. “We look different; we sound different,” says Eddie S. Glaude Jr., a professor of religion and African-American studies at Princeton who spoke at the Pew conference. “Historically locked out of black politics because we didn’t march, we now have Ph.D.s and J.D.s,” he said, describing this group, of which he is one, as “post-soul babies.” Along with Obama, they are finding their political voices, and the traditional brokers like the Reverend Wright and the Rev. Jesse Jackson are vulnerable, caught in the generational divide that is confounding the black community.

Obama campaigned as the candidate who could bring…

By Eleanor Clift
Newsweek

Read the rest:
http://www.newsweek.com/id/176164&GT1=43002

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Sarah Palin’s Church Set Ablaze: Arson

December 14, 2008

Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin’s home church was badly damaged by arson, leading the governor to apologize Saturday if the fire was connected to “undeserved negative attention” from her campaign as the Republican vice presidential nominee.

Damage to the Wasilla Bible Church was estimated at $1 million, authorities said. No one was injured in the fire, which was set Friday night while a handful of people, including two children, were inside, according to James Steele, the Central Mat-Su fire chief.

A snow covered tree sits outside of the fire damaged Wasilla ... 
A snow covered tree sits outside of the fire damaged Wasilla Bible Church in Wasilla, Alaska Saturday Dec. 13, 2008. Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin’s home church was badly damaged in an arson fire. No one was injured in the fire, which was intentionally set while people, including two children, were inside.(AP Photo/Al Grillo)

He said the blaze was being investigated as an arson. Steele said he didn’t know of any recent threats to the church, and authorities did not know whether Palin’s connection to the church was relevant to the fire.

“It’s hard to say at this point. Everything is just speculation,” he said.

Pastor Larry Kroon declined to say whether the church had received any recent threats.

Palin was not at the church at the time of the fire. She stopped by Saturday, and her spokesman Bill McAllister said in a statement that the governor told an assistant pastor she was sorry if the fire was connected to the “undeserved negative attention” the church has received since she became the vice presidential candidate Aug. 29.

Alaska Governor Sarah Palin answers questions from the media ... 

“Whatever the motives of the arsonist, the governor has faith in the scriptural passage that what was intended for evil will in some way be used for good,” McAllister said.

The 1,000-member evangelical church was the subject of intense scrutiny after Palin was named Sen. John McCain ‘s running mate. Early in Palin’s campaign, the church was criticized for promoting in a Sunday bulletin a Love Won Out conference in Anchorage sponsored by Focus on the Family.  The conference promised to “help men and women dissatisfied with living homosexually understand that same-sex attractions can be overcome.”

The fire was set at the entrance of the church and moved inward as a small group of women worked on crafts, Steele said. The group was alerted to the blaze by a fire alarm.