Archive for the ‘collapse’ Category

Drugs, Crime Make Mexico “Under Sustained Assault”

January 18, 2009

Last Monday President-elect Barack Obama met with Mexico’s President Caderon.  Then came the news from a U.S. military study that says Mexico could “collapse” from the wight of “sustained assault” in the drug war. 

U.S. military reports are not known for their alarmist tone. But this assessment  is unheard of and unusually stark  for a North American ally.
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Obama praised Calderon Monday for his work on energy and climate change yesterday.

But neither a bad environment nor energy problems are as likely to bring Mexico to its knees — and impact negatively on the United States — as the drug war, according to the U.S. military.

Most observers have ignored the elephant in the room and on the North American contintent: Mexico is in real trouble.

Mexico and the U.S. are watching as millions of illegal immigrants move from Mexico northward and while drug lords kill off law enforcement and law abiding political leaders, citizens and  politicians in Mexico.

Most news stories of the Calderon-Obama meeting failed to mention either the drug issue or major immigration problems until somewhere around paragraph eight….

Related:
Mexico: Obama Can’t Ignore Elephant on the Continent

President-elect Barack Obama meets with Mexico's President Felipe ... 
President-elect Barack Obama meets with Mexico’s President Felipe Calderon at the Mexican Cultural Institute in Washington, January 12, 2009.(Larry Downing/Reuters)

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Indiscriminate kidnappings. Nearly daily beheadings. Gangs that mock and kill government agents.

This isn’t Iraq or Pakistan. It’s Mexico, which the U.S. government and a growing number of experts say is becoming one of the world’s biggest security risks.

The prospect that America’s southern neighbor could melt into lawlessness provides an unexpected challenge to Barack Obama‘s new government. In its latest report anticipating possible global security risks, the U.S. Joint Forces Command lumps Mexico and Pakistan together as being at risk of a “rapid and sudden collapse.”

By TRACI CARL, Associated Press Writer Traci Carl, Associated Press Writer

The Mexican possibility may seem less likely, but the government, its politicians, police and judicial infrastructure are all under sustained assault and pressure by criminal gangs and drug cartels,” the command said in the report published Nov. 25.

“How that internal conflict turns out over the next several years will have a major impact on the stability of the Mexican state.”

Retiring CIA chief Michael Hayden told reporters on Friday that that Mexico could rank alongside Iran as a challenge for Obama — perhaps a greater problem than Iraq.

The U.S. Justice Department said last month that Mexican gangs are the “biggest organized crime threat to the United States.” National security adviser Stephen Hadley said last week that the worsening violence threatens Mexico’s very democracy.

Related:
 Mexico: “under sustained assault”; Could “collapse” — U.S. Military

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090118/
ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_mexico_besieged

Mexico: “under sustained assault”; Could “collapse” — U.S. Military

January 14, 2009

During the same week that President-elect Barack Obama met with Mexico’s President Caderon comes news from a U.S. military study that says Mexico could “collapse” from the wight of “sustained assault” in the drug war.

The U.S. military reports is unheard of and unusually stark  for a North American ally.
President-elect Barack Obama met with Mexico’s President Felipe Calderon Monday.

Obama praised Calderon for his work on energy and climate change yesterday.

But neither a bad environment nor energy problems are as likely to bring Mexico to its knees — and impact the United States — as the drug war, according to the U.S. military.

Most observers have ignored the elephant in the room and on the North American contintent: Mexico is in real trouble.

Mexico and the U.S. are watching as millions of illegal immigrants move from Mexico northward and while drug lords kill off law enforcement and law abiding political leaders, citizens and  politicians in Mexico.

Most news stories of the Calderon-Obama meeting failed to mention either the drug issue or major immigration problems until somewhere around paragraph eight….

Related:
Mexico: Obama Can’t Ignore Elephant on the Continent

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The El Paso Times
January 14, 2009

Mexico is one of two countries that “bear consideration for a rapid and sudden collapse,” according to a report by the U.S. Joint Forces Command on worldwide security threats.

The command’s “Joint Operating Environment (JOE 2008)” report, which contains projections of global threats and potential next wars, puts Pakistan on the same level as Mexico. “In terms of worse-case scenarios for the Joint Force and indeed the world, two large and important states bear consideration for a rapid and sudden collapse: Pakistan and Mexico.

“The Mexican possibility may seem less likely, but the government, its politicians, police and judicial infrastructure are all under sustained assault and pressure by criminal gangs and drug cartels. How that internal conflict turns out over the next several years will have a major impact on the stability of the Mexican state. Any descent…

Read the rest:
http://www.military.com/news/article/joint-fo
rces-warns-of-mexico-collapse.html

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From the Associated Press

President George W. Bush on Tuesday pledged continued U.S. cooperation on narcotrafficking in Mexico, saying the United States has a responsibility to help prevent guns from moving south across the border.

Bush had his final Oval Office meeting with Mexican President Felipe Calderon, a leader U.S. officials have praised for deploying troops to fight cartels and capturing top drug kingpins. Calderon won a multimillion-dollar, anti-drug aid package from Washington last year.

Incoming President-elect Barack Obama, who met with Calderon on Monday, supports the plan, known as the Merida Initiative, and has promised to help end gun-smuggling from the U.S. to Mexico.

“Americans are concerned about the battle that’s taking place in Mexico, and I want our fellow citizens to understand that this man understands the responsibilities of government to provide security,” Bush said.

“The less drugs we use, the less pressure there’ll be in Mexico. We have got responsibilities to help prevent guns from going from the United States into Mexico.”

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/2009011
3/ap_on_go_pr_wh/us_mexico_1

Russian Professor Predicts Fall of U.S. in 2010

December 29, 2008

For a decade, Russian academic Igor Panarin has been predicting the U.S. will fall apart in 2010. Now he’s found an eager audience: Russian state media, who are interviewing him twice a day.

A polite and cheerful man with a buzz cut, Professor Panarin insists he does not dislike Americans. But he warns that the outlook for them is dire.

[Prof. Panarin]

Igor Panarin

“There’s a 55-45 percent chance right now that disintegration will occur,” says Panarin. “One could rejoice in that process,” he adds, poker-faced. “But if we’re talking reasonably, it’s not the best scenario — for Russia.”

Prof. Panarin, 50 years old, is not a fringe figure. A former KGB analyst, he is dean of the Russian Foreign Ministry’s academy for future diplomats. He is invited to Kremlin receptions, lectures students, publishes books, and appears in the media as an expert on U.S.-Russia relations.

Mr. Panarin posits, in brief, that mass immigration, economic decline, and moral degradation will trigger a civil war next fall and the collapse of the dollar. Around the end of June 2010, or early July, he says, the U.S. will break into six pieces — with Alaska reverting to Russian control.

Read the rest from The Wall Street Journal:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123051100709638419.html

Somalia Pirates Mark Nation Near Collapse

December 20, 2008

The Bush administration inherited a mess in strategic Somalia and may be leaving President-elect Barack Obama with a worse one.

The explosion of piracy off Somalia’s coast is an attention-grabbing product of internal chaos in the Horn of Africa country, and a problem that will outlast the administration’s success this past week in winning U.N. backing for possible pirate-hunting raids on Somali territory.

“We have a framework in place now to deal with this issue, but it’s not going to be a very easy one,” State Department spokesman Robert Wood said.

By ANNE GEARAN, AP Military Writer

FILE---Dutch cargo ships the MV Stolt Innovation, in the foreground, ...

Wood meant that there is more to do to combat piracy, and indeed Somali gunmen seized two more ships the day the Security Council voted unanimously to authorize nations to conduct land and air attacks on pirate bases on Somali coast.

Bandits are taking over more and larger ships and ranging farther from land to do it. Last month they seized a Saudi oil tanker carrying $100 million worth of crude.

The larger problem, however, is the hollowness of nearly every institution that makes a working country, despite more than 15 years of international help. The Somali pirates may be bandits and thugs, but they also are entrepreneurs making do in a place without a functioning government, laws or normal commerce.

RNPS IMAGES OF THE YEAR 2008  The Liberian-flagged oil tanker ...
The Liberian-flagged oil tanker MV Sirius Star is shown at anchor on November 19, 2008, off the coast of Somalia. The Saudi supertanker was hijacked by Somali pirates November 15, was seized 450 nautical miles southeast of Mombasa, Kenya, and forced to proceed to anchorage near Harardhere, Somalia. REUTERS/Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class William S. Stevens-US Navy/Handout

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081220/ap_on_go_pr_wh/us_somalia

Amid Cholera Epidemic, EU Says Time to Push Out Zimbabwe’s Mugabe

December 8, 2008

The European Union joined calls on Monday for Zimbabwe’s President Robert Mugabe to step down from the leadership of his crisis-hit country.

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe raises his fist during a ...

“I think the moment has arrived to put all the pressure for Mugabe to step down,” EU foreign policy chief Javier Solana told reporters ahead of a meeting of European foreign ministers in Brussels.

Solana said it was possible that the 27-nation bloc could decide at the meeting to add up to 11 names to an already long list of Zimbabwean officials banned from traveling in Europe, but argued against any further sanctions on a country whose once-thriving economy is now devastated.

“Everything that can be done has been done…The important thing is the political pressure now,” he said.

The United States said on Friday that Mugabe’s departure from office was long overdue and that a food crisis and cholera epidemic in Zimbabwe meant it was now vital for the international community to act.

Britain has told Zimbabwe’s neighbors they could expect firm international support for any effort to bring a “real change” to Zimbabwe.

(Reporting by Ingrid Melander; writing by Mark John at Reuters)