Archive for the ‘Collins’ Category

Republicans: If You Can’t Agree On Core Values Now, Commit Harakiri

March 13, 2009

Arch liberal Bush hater Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) was on the conservative Fox News Channel today to say, “Our country is being looted.”

If he can get this: so can all Republicans.

This is time for Republicans to stand united or die trying.  And for some that are on the fence like Maine’s Snowe and Collins and Arlen Specter of the Keystone state: we say adieu or seppuku.

Health care?  Good luck: but try to stand united.

Schools should be federalized and the White House is writing the legislation?  No brainer.

Spending at the rate of $1 billion an hour?  Unsustainable generational theft.  Even China is worried.

Energy: are you with Al Gore or against him?

Foreign policy?  Do you believe Iran, China, North Korea and the Taliban will play nice?

Terrorism: a word Obama has removed from the lexicon, is still maybe a threat?  What say you.

Corruption: Republicans want an end of corruption and total truth and honesty in government.  Right?

Time to ressurect the Newt style contract with what’s remaining of America before it is too late guys and gals….

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Daniel Flynn writes in today’s American Spectator, “If fiscal restraint, individual responsibility, the protection of human life, support for the 2nd Amendment and a robust military, and an abiding believe in American exceptionalism, are unpalatable to the likes of Frum, the left will certainly welcome him as the latest intellectual quisling, and exploit him for their own political designs.”

http://spectator.org/archives/200
9/03/13/frum-right-to-wrong

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Related:

 China’s Economic Might, Arrogance Should Cause Caution in the West

Japan Ready To Shoot Down North Korean Missile

Obama’s Poll Numbers Are Falling to Earth

 Obama’s Schools Will Have To Follow Federal Rules, Like Socialist, Communist Schools

Obama’s mythical mystique of government and science and their inherent moral benevolence

Culture of Corruption: Many Americans Losing Trust in Government?

Obama stimulus is “welfare spendathon”

February 15, 2009

The largest one-year increase in government handouts in American history.

A “welfare spendathon.”

The process?  Shameful.

Representative Says Stimulus “Stinks,” Details “Intentionally Hidden from Lawmakers, American Voters”

A return to rewarding no work with other workers’ hard earned pay. In massive amounts.

And pork.  Pork some say Americans don’t care about.  But I care about my money going to waste. I hate pork vendors.  Which means most Democrats.

Schumer Says Americans Don’t Care About Pork Spending

And I care about my money going to China.  And oil rich emirates where no men work….

Stimulus: China Will Fund U.S. Debt But “We Hate You Guys”

It’s the stimulus.  The Obama stimulus.  The Democrats’ stimulus.

Oh, and three doomed Republican senators.  Snowe, Collins and Specter.  They joined the welfare Democrats, the Schumer poksters, the “we don’t care,” the idle, the “we don’t pay taxes.”  Those that gloat.

Pardon me if I’m angry.  I’ve always paid my taxes.  Probably overpaid.

Tim Geithner?  No.  Dashcle? No.  Obama?  Uncertain.

But we sure raided the Traesury big time this time.  Didn’t we?

“If this is going to be bipartisanship, the country’s screwed,” Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-South Carolina, told ABC’s “This Week.” “I know bipartisanship when I see it.”

The president says Air Force One is a “spiffy ride.”

It’s my aircraft and my fuel, pal.  I paid and can prove it.

U.S. President Barack Obama waves as he boards Air Force One ...
U.S. President Barack Obama waves as he boards Air Force One in Washington enroute to Chicago to spend the President’s Day holiday weekend with his family at their home there February 13, 2009.REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/02/13/air.force.one/
index.html?eref=ib_topstories

We’ll, he’s living on my money.  We both have to get used to it.  We don’t have to like it…..

Now I am the schmuck.

How do you feel?

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The new administration’s economic stimulus plan may undo reforms that cut the dole queues, critics say

RONALD REAGAN started it, Bill Clinton finished it and last week Barack Obama was accused of engineering its destruction. One of the few undisputed triumphs of American government of the past 20 years – the sweeping welfare reform programme that sent millions of dole claimants back to work – has been plunged into jeopardy by billions of dollars in state handouts included in the president’s controversial economic stimulus package.

As Obama celebrated Valentine’s Day yesterday with a return to his Chicago home for a private weekend with family and friends, his success in piloting a $785 billion (£546 billion) stimulus package through Congress was being overshadowed by warnings that an unprecedented increase in welfare spending would undermine two decades of bipartisan attempts to reduce dependency on government handouts.

Robert Rector, a prominent welfare researcher who was one of the architects of Clinton’s 1996 reform bill, warned last week that Obama’s stimulus plan was a “welfare spendathon” that would amount to the largest one-year increase in government handouts in American history.

Douglas Besharov, author of a big study on welfare reform, said the stimulus bill passed by Congress and the Senate in separate votes on Friday would “unravel” most of the 1996 reforms that led to a 65% reduction in welfare caseloads and prompted the British and several other governments to consider similar measures.

Read the rest:
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new
s/world/us_and_americas/article573
3499.ece

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Related:
 Obama ‘Business as Usual’ Despite Pledges

GOP Lawmakers Feel “Screwed”
http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/02
/15/obama.gop.stimulus/index.html?sec
tion=cnn_latest

Missing from Congress’ stimulus negotiations: transparency

 Stimulus Proves Obama (And The NYT) Have No Idea What “Bipartisanship” Means; Or Could Care Less

Obama Team: Winning isn’t everything; it’s the only thing

http://michellemalkin.com/2009/0
2/15/taxpayer-revolt-porkulus-pro
test-in-seattle/

http://alphainventions.com/

McCain as Worthless Old Man:
http://suzieqq.wordpress.com/2009/02/15/shrum
-on-mccain-he-has-gone-from-being-an-angry-o
ld-candidate-to-being-an-angry-old-defeated-candidate/

Republicans Helping Obama Reduced By One: On Linclon’s Birthday, Turncoats Wobbly?

February 12, 2009

Judd Gregg, the Republican senator from New Hampshire who agreed a few days agao to join the Obama Administration’s Commerce Department as the Secretary of Commerce nominee, abruptly removed his name today.

The withdrawal appeared to take the White House by surprise, with members of the president’s media operation learning of Gregg’s decision from reporters.

Gregg seemed to indicate that he was not fully briefed on the White House plan to move the census from Commerce to the Executive Branch and he was havig difficulty swallowing the Obama stimulus.

Three Republican senators did vote for the stimulus: Senators Collins and Snowe from Maine and Arlen Specter of  Pennsylvania.

The GOP had been reluctant to embrace the stimulus plan, but Collins,  Snowe and Specter largely stood out by bucking their party. They were the three Republicans who supported the first Senate version.

Obama described Snowe and Collins as “outstanding legislators who care about their state but who also care about this country.”

Today, Lincoln’s birthday, President Obama asked all Americans to stand united and behind one flag.

But for Judd Gregg, a man noted for his principled stands, the census deal and the stimulus were just too tough to take.

David Lightman wrote:

Two of the renegade Republican senators critical to getting the economic stimulus bill through the Senate – Maine’s Olympia Snowe and Susan Collins – represent a state where folks are known for their flinty, thrifty ways.

The other, Arlen Specter, is from Pennsylvania, where the government has long been regarded as an economic lifeline.

So it’s hardly a surprise that the three moderate Republicans are the only lawmakers in their party so far to go along with the Democrats’ economic stimulus plan. They play a key role in shaping a compromise stimulus package, since Democrats control 58 Senate seats and need at least two more to cut off procedural roadblocks.

Read the rest:
http://www.sanluisobispo.com/
news/politics/story/619082.html

http://michellemalkin.com/2009
/02/12/judd-gregg-withdraws-n
omination/

Congress struggles to weed out the weaker parts of the stimulus bill

February 10, 2009

PRESIDENT OBAMA was back on the hustings Monday, promoting an $800 billion-plus stimulus package at a town meeting in economically distressed Elkhart, Ind. “It is the right size, it is the right scope,” Mr. Obama said. Of course, it is still not entirely clear what “it” is. The House has produced an $819 billion plan that emphasizes new federal spending over tax relief. The Senate is working on an $827 billion proposal tilted more toward tax cuts, in order to garner sufficient moderate Republican support to prevent a filibuster. The country won’t really know what it’s getting until the two chambers hammer out a compromise.
.
Editorial
The WashingtonPost
As Mr. Obama said Monday night, a stimulus bill is badly needed, and soon. And the differences between the House and Senate measures are not large. Both would spend $47 billion to extend and slightly increase unemployment benefits; increase spending for food stamps; incorporate Mr. Obama’s proposal for a $500-per-worker, $1,000-per-couple tax credit over the next two years; and raise the earned-income tax credit for the working poor. The relative consensus on these points is welcome and not that surprising, since they represent the least controversial examples of short-term, quick-spending aid in the two bills.

Sens. Ben Nelson (D-Neb.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) worked to scrub some less plausibly stimulative stuff from the Senate bill. But that measure still contains some dubious provisions, especially on the tax side. A $15,000 tax credit for new home purchases this year, which would cost more than $35 billion, looks especially wasteful. The proposal, drafted by Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.), is supposed to stimulate the moribund housing market. Actually, because it is not limited to first-time homebuyers, the credit would do little to reduce swollen inventories: Homeowners who used this tax break to get a new house would have to put their old one up for sale. The Senate bill would also create an $11 billion deduction for sales taxes on car purchases and auto loan interest, a proposal sponsored by Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.). It’s unclear how many people would be lured into the new-car market, already rich with dealer incentives, by this additional one. Given the modest probable benefits, Congress should cut these provisions and consider devoting at least some of the savings to spending that is likely to provide more immediate bang for the buck.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content
/article/2009/02/09/AR2009020902279.html?
hpid=topnews

Still Work Needed on “Stimulus;” House, Senate Miles Apart

February 8, 2009

While usually a “conference committee” between the House and the Senate on a spending bill irons out differences btween the two chambers on the measure; nothing has been usual about the “emergency relief” or stimulus bill so it may follow that the rules and norms of the confernce will not be norms at all.

The Senate cut out some favorite spending programs of the House — primarily tens of billions of dollars in aid to states and local governments, tax provisions, and education, health and renewable energy programs.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has already vowed to put the money back in — and Republican Senator Susan Collins, who supported the senate version of the stimulus says she has “no obligation to support the bill that come out of the conference committee.”

The competing bills now reflect substantially different approaches. The House puts greater emphasis on helping states and localities avoid wide-scale cuts in services and layoffs of public employees. The Senate cut $40 billion of that aid from its bill, which is expected to be approved Tuesday.

The Senate plan also focuses somewhat more heavily on tax cuts, provides far less generous health care subsidies for the unemployed and lowers a proposed increase in food stamps.

Pelosi and many in the House don’t like those tax cuts and are expected to work to restore items like the health care and food stamp money.

The Senate plan also creates new tax incentives to encourage Americans to buy homes and cars within the next year.

Pelosi called the emerging Senate cuts to the stimulus program “very damaging” and said she was “very much opposed to them.”

In the Senate there are several Republicans waving a Congressional Budget Report that says in the long term the stimulus will slow investment and add to the debt.
.
“If you knew a bill in the U.S. Senate would cause a recession in 10 years, would you support it?” asked Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Arizona. “That’s what the Congressional Budget Office, the bipartisan office that supports our efforts in the Congress, says about this legislation. … There will be negative [gross domestic product] in this decade as a result of this legislation.”

And there are those like John McCain and Lindsey Graham wondering why there is no defense sepending in the bill.

In a Washington Post Op-Ed Sunday, Tom Donnelly and Gary Schmitt of  the American Enterprise Institute advocate defense spending in the stimulus saying:

“During the transition, the Obama team advanced three principles about stimulus spending: It should be timely (putting dollars into economic circulation rapidly), targeted (of clear value to the nation) and temporary (not a new and permanent entitlement or long-term program that would make the government’s finances even more problematic).

Defense programs more than meet these criteria, as many mainstream economists have pointed out. Compared with infrastructure programs that require lengthy planning, design and approval processes, extending efficient, already running defense procurements would have brief, as the military says, “flash-to-bang” times. And a dollar invested in such programs would not only circulate rapidly but would also have a multiplying effect, sustaining jobs not only among prime contractors but also among their suppliers.”

Plus the pressure will not subside on the lawmakers: from the White House, voters, talking heads, news media and even bloggers.

John E. Carey
Wakefield Chapel, Virginia

Whatever its flaws, the stimulus package could create or save as many as 4 million jobs by the end of next year, helping to offset the 3.6 million jobs lost since the nation slid into recession in December 2007, according to an analysis by Allen Sinai, chief global economist for Decision Economics.

“This is a seismic shift in the role of government in our society,” said  Sinai. “Those who believe the government can be an effective, positive instrument for good will have another chance to try it,” said Sinai, a political independent.

Pelosi responds on bipartisanship
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/
2009/feb/07/pelosi-chides-republican-at
tacks-stimulus-bill/

The L.A. Times on the Stimulus:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationwo
rld/nation/la-na-stimulus8-2009feb08,
0,659034.story

In Defense of Defense in the Stimulus
Tom Donnelly and Gary Schmitt
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn
/content/article/2009/02/06/AR20090
20603513.html?hpid=opinionsbox1

Economists on the Stimulus: The Washington Post
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/conte
nt/article/2009/02/07/AR2009020702159.ht
ml?hpid=topnews

Oliver North: Stimulate Defense
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/200
9/feb/08/stimulate-defense/

CNN:
http://edition.cnn.com/2009/POLITIC
S/02/07/stimulus/index.html

This Stimulus Probably Won’t Create Jobs; But Will Make For More Debt

Senate Votes On Economic Stimulus Package 
.
Independent Sen. Joe Lieberman, from left, Democratic Sen. Ben Nelson, and Republican Sens. Arlen Specter and Susan Collins arrive to talk to reporters about a deal being arranged on the economic stimulus bill. The compromise, negotiated behind the scenes, would slice some $110 billion from the bill, which had grown to $930 billion as amended on the Senate floor.  Photo: Brendan Smialowski, Getty Images

Stimulus Friday: White House Waits; Senate Debates; Vote Tonight?

February 6, 2009

As an impatient White House watched from the sidelines, Senate Democrats redoubled their efforts to complete passage this weekend of a massive economic recovery bill sought by President Barack Obama.

By David Rogers, Politico

Harry Reid
Meetings intensified among a bipartisan bloc of senators seeking to trim close to $90 billion from a massive economic recovery bill nearing final action.  Photo by AP

Bipartisan talks continued Thursday night on a package of spending cuts to win over moderate Republicans. Failing that, the Appropriations Committee leadership was preparing its own amendment to address concerns among rank-and-file members in both parties.

“I do believe that at this moment that we’re going to be able to achieve it,” said Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) Thursday night. Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) described himself as “cautiously optimistic” that the bill can pass late Friday.

Minutes before Collins and Reid could be seen through the open doors of the Senate back lobby as she appealed to the Democratic leader to back away from his plan to keep the Senate in session all night.

“I told him if we had more time we could achieve what everyone is shooting for,” Collins said. “But if the process is rushed, it diminishes our chances.” 

Read the rest:
http://www.politico.com/news/stor
ies/0209/18461.html

Bipartisan Push to Trim Size of Stimulus Plan

February 6, 2009

A bipartisan group of senators worked furiously in backroom negotiations on Thursday to cut the cost of the more than $920 billion economic stimulus plan. Senate Democratic leaders said they would await the outcome of those talks before calling for a final vote on the measure, perhaps on Friday.

By DAVID M. HERSZENHORN
The New York Times

Members of the bipartisan group, led by Senators Ben Nelson, Democrat of Nebraska, and Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, said they wanted to trim provisions that would not quickly create jobs or encourage spending by consumers and businesses. They spent much of the day scrutinizing the 736-page bill and wrangling over what to cut.

By early evening, aides said the group had drafted a list of nearly $90 billion in cuts, including $40 billion in aid for states, more than $14 billion for various education programs, $4.1 billion to make federal buildings energy efficient and $1.5 billion for broadband Internet service in rural areas. But they remained short of a deal, and talks were expected to resume Friday morning.

“We’re trying to focus it on spending that truly helps stimulate the economy,” Ms. Collins said. “People have different views on whether or not a program meets that test. So we’re continuing to talk. We get close, and then it drops back, and then we get close again.”

President Obama, while once again urging Congress to act swiftly, avoided taking sides by saying that a package of about $800 billion was in the ballpark of what he believed the economy needed.

“The scale and scope of this plan is right,” Mr. Obama said in a speech to House Democrats who were on a retreat in Williamsburg, Va.

“If we do not move swiftly,” the president said, “an economy that is in crisis will be faced with catastrophe.” He added, “Millions more Americans will lose their jobs. Homes will be lost. Families will go without health care. Our crippling dependence on foreign oil will continue. That is the price of inaction.”

The White House announced that Mr. Obama would make a televised speech to the nation about the economy on Monday night.

The Senate debate took place on the eve of the release of January jobs data. Economists expect the national unemployment rate to hit 7.5 percent, and to reach double digits in some industrial states. Last week, almost 4.8 million people collected unemployment insurance, the highest weekly number in 40 years.

The majority leader, Senator Harry Reid of Nevada, said he believed that Democrats could muscle the stimulus bill through with at least two Republican votes. But late Thursday he said he would give the bipartisan group until Friday to reach a deal. If no deal is reached, he said he would call for procedural vote on Sunday aimed at moving to final vote.

Read the rest:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/0
6/us/politics/06stimulus.html?_r=1&hp