Archive for the ‘conservative’ Category

Mark Levin Reminds Americans that Values Count

March 24, 2009

Republicans need to review the past in order to effectively move into the future.

And Republicans need to regain their core values fast in order to effectively work through the current Obama Administration’s march toward socialism.

The Republican past is not John McCain, much as he is loved and admired.

And though many of us think about Ronald Reagan, we must grasp the values and not the personalities we need now — a personality will rise in his or her own time.

Mark Levin’s book  “Liberty and Tyranny” is an effort to get us all to think again about the values we need.

Judd Gregg, who nearly became Barack Obama’s Commerce Secretary, seems to have regained his good thinking and is now speaking out about the Obama budget.

“It just seems inappropriate and irresponsible to spend so much that we send along a huge debt to our children and grandchildren,” he said today on the Fox News Channel.

Good Republican thinking.

“This is a massive spending document that increases government and taxes dramatically.”

So is that a good thing?

Republican cannot allow Rahm Emanuel, Robert Gibbs and the others to define them.  Democrats fear a united conservative movement and have worked hard to make the discussion about Limbaugh or Steele.

The discussion is not about who.  The discussion is about the values and how best to achieve them.

Related:
Republicans: If You Can’t Agree On Core Values Now, Commit Harakiri

 Republicans Must Hang Together, or One By One

Michelle:
http://michellemalkin.com/2009/03/2
4/congrats-mark-levin/

 Liberated “Almost Commerce Sec” Gregg: Obama’s Harshest Budget, Debt Critic

 U.S. Seeks Expanded Power to Seize Firms

 Because of Obama, Our enemies sense weakness

Senators Ready To Abandon Missile Defense:
http://senatus.wordpress.com/2009/03/24/lev
in-hopes-missile-defense-compromises-lead-t
o-russian-assistance-on-iran/

GOP sees signs of life in Northeast

In Conservative Alaska, Banks Aren’t Full of “Toxic Assets”

March 16, 2009

Most major banks and credit unions in Alaska seem to be in good health, despite the worsening news about the economy and the recent bailout of troubled national banks.

By Elizabeth Bluemink
Anchorage Daily News

One positive sign is that many of the state’s largest banks and credit unions grew in local profits, revenue, loan activity or deposits last year.

What will happen this year is a different question. Last year, many local financial institutions benefited from high oil prices and fatter-than-normal Permanent Fund dividends. This year, oil and mineral prices are down, tourism is expected to suffer and some of the state’s largest employers are laying off workers.

But because most banks in Alaska avoided risky loans, and because economists aren’t predicting severe job losses in Alaska this year, Anchorage financial executives don’t expect the sort of meltdown and loss of shareholder confidence that has pummeled their colleagues in the Lower 48.

“There’s a dislocation between what people are seeing on the national news and what’s happening here,” said Jason Roth, chief financial officer at First National Bank Alaska.

According to regulatory filings at the end of last year, all of the state’s major banks exceeded federal regulators’ threshold for maintaining enough financial backing to cover the risk of failed loans. And that includes the three banks — Wells Fargo, Key Bank and Alaska Pacific Bancshares — that accepted money from the U.S. Treasury as part of its Troubled Asset Relief Program, otherwise known as the national bank bailout or TARP.

Credit unions also seem to be doing OK, though they say they are affected by the financial woes of their customers.

“Most credit unions in Alaska are well capitalized but these are tough times,” said James Wileman, president of the Alaska Credit Union League.

Members of his Sitka credit union, for example, are hurting due to troubles in the community’s tourism- and fishing-dependent economy, he said.

Like Alaska’s banks, the credit unions recently had to begin paying a higher premium into a national fund that protects customer deposits if financial institutions fail.

“All the credit unions (and banks) in the country had to pay in,” Wileman said, noting that because it was a one-time event, his company does not plan to pass along that cost to its customers.

 

HEAVEY LOSSES

Several banks in Alaska have benefitted from the national bailout.

Juneau-based Alaska Pacific received $4.8 million from TARP this year — the only Alaska-based bank to do so. The Juneau bank suffered financial losses last year due to delinquent loans. Over half those loans were in the Lower 48 and involved troubled real estate projects. As a result, the bank suspended its dividends to investors in the final part of 2008.

Key Bank suffered a $1.5 billion national loss in 2008, in part because it needed to reserve a large part of its income for delinquent loans, according to its most recent financial statement. In November, Key Bank accepted a $2.5 billion loan from the Treasury’s TARP fund.

But Key Bank says its business grew in Alaska last year: lending increased 16 percent last year.

In October, Wells Fargo Bank accepted a $25 billion loan from the TARP that it says it didn’t want or need, and only took at the insistence of federal officials.

The bank reported a $2.6 billion profit last year and its business in Alaska was the best it’s ever been, said the bank’s regional president Richard Strutz.

In Alaska, Wells Fargo’s revenue and deposits grew more than 9 percent last year, and its loan activity increased more than 4 percent.

Strutz said he doesn’t expect this year to go as well. “We haven’t escaped the issues in the Lower 48,” he said, noting lower commodity prices and the predicted downturn in tourism.

 

PROSPERING BANKS

How did Alaska’s prospering banks avoid the troubles of others that have generated cringe-inducing headlines in recent months?

Last year’s strong economy and high oil prices certainly played a role. But local banks also claim they were more conservative than some of their larger colleagues.

“You don’t see community banks putting people in loans that aren’t appropriate and you don’t see them with toxic assets,” said Roth, of First National.

His bank and Anchorage-based Northrim BanCorp both decided not to participate in the TARP program. Both banks were profitable last year.

First National’s annual profit last year increased about 13 percent to $42.9 million and the value of its assets was about $2.4 billion.

Northrim reported a $6.1 million profit last year and assets of $1 billion.

Taking On The “Establishment”: Michelle Malkin

March 15, 2009

Michelle Malkin was ready to pounce when a new report appeared last week detailing the Democratic House speaker’s use of military aircraft.

“Nancy Pelosi is the Jennifer Lopez of congressional travel,” Malkin wrote. Her March 11 column outlined the nature of Pelosi’s trips and quoted from her staffers’ impatient demands — and from the befuddled responses of military officials, worried at the misuse of resources. “No word on whether Pelosi required vanilla-scented candles, Evian water and fresh white lilies aboard the flight,” she concluded.

By DAVID FREDDOSO
Examiner Staff Writer

This is Malkin at her best. Fans enjoy her syndicated column for its documentation of liberal outrages, but also for her provocative, humorous presentation of the facts. Critics bridle at the provocations, missing the humor entirely. The formula makes Malkin distinctively controversial, and loved or hated by everyone who reads her.

In 2004, when the Virginian-Pilot of Norfolk dropped her column, its editors denounced her as “too stridently anti-liberal” and claimed that she “habitually mistakes shrill for thought-provoking and substitutes screaming for discussion.” Malkin, whose column is routinely picked up and dropped by newspapers without comment, mused on her blog that the paper probably should never have picked her up in the first place. “I was just as ‘anti-liberal’ five years ago as I am now,” she wrote.

Malkin is generous with harsh words, and she spares no one in the public eye.

Read the rest:
http://www.dcexaminer.com/politic
s/Michelle-Malkin-Making-War-Wit
h-Words-41215392.html

http://michellemalkin.com/200
9/03/15/sunday-open-thread-6/


Michelle Malkin, 38, established her combative writing style in her pre-blog career at the Los Angeles Daily News and the Seattle Times. Her old columns from the 1990s attack multiculturalists, moral relativists, teachers unions, Bring Your Daughter to Work Day and apologists for the Rodney King rioters. ANDREW HARNIK/EXAMINER


We owe a lot to Michelle Malkin… and also Barry Obama, Joke Biden, TurboTax Geithner, Rosy Romer…..

Tax Marijuana, Health Benefits? Obama Will Fiddle While It All Burns….

If you don’t get well at least you can get high….

Stimulus: “Obama is popular but has no clout”

February 14, 2009

Leading liberal and conservatives columnists and TV talking heads agreed tonight that for President Barack Obama the economic stimulus is a “Short term gain but a long term loss.”

Syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer said, “Obama contradicted everything he said he stood for” during the process of making the stimulus.

“He did not work toward bipartianship and got not one conservative Republican vote.”

Krauthammer said “the president showed he would enact legislation by ramming it down throats,” a reference to the language President Obama used at last Monday’s press conference.

He also criticized the ugly process used to make the stimulus bill and the speed of the legislation; much of the blame for which lies with Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., center, flanked by House ... 
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., center, flanked by House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Md., left, and Rep John Larson, D-Conn., right, speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Feb. 13, 2009, after the House passed the stimulus legislation.(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

“Not one House member or Senator read this package and understands it,” Krauthammer said.

Liberal Juan Williams said, “I agree with Charles that ‘haste makes waste’ but in this economic situation haste was necessary.”

Conservative Fred Barnes said, “The president got no help from Republicans.”

Barnes said, “The president obviously wasted his time in Peoria, Fort Myers, and Elkhart….And he wasted his time holding a cocktail party and a Super Bowl party.”

Barnes said Obama was popular “but has no clout.”

http://michellemalkin.com/2009/02/13/
the-house-dems-who-voted-no-the-sena
te-vote-underway/

http://willobrien.wordpress.com/2009
/02/13/three-lessons-for-managers-fro
m-president-obama/

.
http://johnbrodigan.com/2009/02
/13/kill-the-rinos-really/

.
“We’re not moving quickly because we’re trying to jam something down people’s throats. We’re moving quickly because if we don’t, the economy’s going to keep getting worse.”

That’s what President Barack Obama said late Thursday (Feb 5) at a spa in Williamburg, VA.

Related:
Stimulus: Obama May Need To Make a Deal

What he clearly meant to say was “We’re trying to move quickly because quick action will pay dividends not because we’re trying to jam something down people’s throats….”

If we don’t what?  Jam this down people’s throats?  The President of the United States used that turn of a phrase?  Just like he hauled “catastrophe” out of the verbal closet this week?

The great communicator is in danger of becoming Joe Biden: a guy you don’t want off the script, off the telepromter.

It won’t matter that “I won.”

No clout….

 ‘Catastrophe’ Obama Is Angry; And We Might Be Too

Incoming White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel gestures prior ... 
Leadership and clout?  Incoming White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel gestures prior to the inauguration ceremony of Barack Obama as the 44th President of the United States, in Washington, January 20, 2009.(Jim Young – UNITED STATES/Reuters)

Gregg: ‘I’m Too Conservative’ for Obama

February 13, 2009

Republican Sen. Judd Gregg said Friday that he pulled out of the job of commerce secretary after realizing that “I’m just going to be a little too conservative” for President Obama’s administration.

Associated Press

If you’re going to be on a football team, “you’ve got to pull out and block on every play, you can’t do it on every other play,” the senator said.

“I didn’t feel comfortable going forward because of my individuality, for lack of a better term,” Gregg said during an appearance Friday morning on CNBC.

Gregg said he thinks Obama is on the right track in attempts to stabilize the shaky financial system and that the proposal of Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner — much criticized as being too vague — is going to be an extremely strong initiative once it is filled out with details.

At the same time, Gregg said his conservative inclinations would show up in terms of fiscal spending.

Regarding the $790 billion economic stimulus plan, “I think there was a tactical error made … in that you allowed the appropriators to write the package,” said Gregg.

He said he thinks the stimulus plan “should be focusing mainly on trying to stabilize the real estate markets, and promoting small business and getting jobs.”

Read the rest:
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/first100days
/2009/02/13/gregg-im-conservative-obama/

Iran’s bloggers thrive despite blocks

December 15, 2008

Iran has one of the most vibrant blogging communities in the world – despite government boasts that it blocks five million websites. The BBC’s Jon Leyne in Tehran is spending the day with bloggers to see what makes them tick.

From the BBC
.
With much of the official media controlled by the government or hardline conservatives, the internet has become the favoured way of communicating for Iran’s well-educated and inquisitive younger generation.

Go online in Iran and you will find blogs or websites covering every topic under the sun.

Politics, of course, but also the arts, Hollywood cinema, women’s issues, women’s sport, pop music. Whisper it quietly, there is even an online dating scene in the Islamic Republic.

Day-by-day there is an intriguing cyber-war, as the government wrestles for control of the internet, and Iran’s bloggers wrestle it back.

Iranians surf the World Wide Web at Iran's first Internet ... 
Iranians surf the World Wide Web at Iran’s first Internet cafe in Tehran 1998. Iran has blocked access to more than five million Internet sites, whose content is mostly perceived as immoral and anti-social, a judiciary official was quoted as saying on Wednesday.(AFP/File/Atta Kenare)

Iran hosts around 65,000 bloggers, and has around 22 million internet users. Not bad for a country in which some remote areas do not yet have mains electricity.

Even some journalists who work in the mainstream media use the internet to publish articles they can not get past their newspaper or programme editors, or the official censors.

Read the rest:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7782771.stm