Archive for the ‘cyber security’ Category

Chertoff Says Cyber Threat Increasing

December 20, 2008

Following a two-day wargame exercise on cyber-security issues, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff today said that no one person should be in charge of cyber-security, despite the growing and emerging future threats.

By Jason Ryan
ABC News
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“As we look at this threat, [it] is clearly only intensifying over time,” Chertoff said. “A system where one agency sits over everything, military and civilian, is not usually one that has been regarded favorably by the American public.”

Chertoff urged that the existing cyber-security strategy developed and shared by the Pentagon, Homeland Security and the FBI be continued by the incoming Obama administration. “I’m sure this is going to be a major area of focus of the new administration,” he told the Cyber Strategic Inquiry 2008 Conference in Washington, D.C., which was organized by the government consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton and Business Executives for National Security. “And we obviously want to work with them to help them get the benefit of what we’ve done and whatever advice they seek from us.”

US Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security Michael ...
Michael Chertoff, Director, Homeland Security says cyber security is an ever increasing problem.(AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

Read the rest:
http://www.abcnews.go.com/TheLaw/story?id=6491376&page=1

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Pentagon Says “Secure” Internet System Was Subject of Cyber Attack

December 11, 2008

The Pentagon’s primary secure internet information system has become the subject of a cyber attack.

Experts say the trouble originated in Afghanistan when an outside Internet Service provider (ISP) was hired to support the U.S. troops in Afghanistan.  The ISP turned out to be a front company for former Russian KGB agents.

Fox news is reporting that an external drive like a “thumb drive” was most probably used to penetrate the U.S. system.  U.S. experts are working to determine the full nature of the trouble.

External drives are no loger allowed in DoD systems, we are told.

Pete Hoekstra, a Republican member of the House Intelligence Committee, says even our most secure computer systems are “not secure enough.”

The Department of Defense group evaluating the situation is unsure if Russia is behind the intrusion or another entity used the ISP front company.

“Denial of service” was the first indication of trouble for the Pentagon system.

Experts say that Russia launched a major “Denial of Service” campaign prior to and during the attack on Georgia and South Ossetia last August.  The websites impacted then included the site of Georgia’s President Mikheil Saakashvili.
.The Pentagon US Department of Defense building.jpg

John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom

Related:
 U.S. “Highly Vulnerable” To Cyber attack, Especially Military, Government

 

The official website of Mikheil Saakashvili, the Georgian President

The official website of Mikheil Saakashvili, the Georgian President, was under external control from shortly before Russia’s armed intervention last August until the end of hostilities.

U.S. “Highly Vulnerable” To Cyber attack, Especially Military, Government

December 11, 2008

Center for Cybersecurity Operations is proposed to protect military, government, and corporate electronics from criminals and other nations….

The U.S. faces a cybersecurity threat of such magnitude that the next President should move quickly to create a Center for Cybersecurity Operations and appoint a special White House advisor to oversee it.

Those are among the recommendations in a 44-page report by the U.S. Commission on Cybersecurity. The bipartisan panel includes executives, high-ranking military officers and intelligence officials, leading specialists in computer security, and two members of Congress.

To compile the report, which is entitled “Securing Cyberspace in the 44th Presidency,” commission members say they reviewed tens of thousands of pages of undisclosed documentation, visited forensics labs and the National Security Agency, and were briefed in closed-door sessions by top officials from Pentagon, CIA and British spy agency MI5. From their research, they concluded that the U.S. badly needs a comprehensive cybersecurity policy to replace an outdated checklist of security requirements for government agencies under the existing Federal Information Security Management Act.

The report calls for the creation of a Center for Cybersecurity Operations that would act as a new regulator of computer security in both the public and private sector. Active policing of government and corporate networks would include new rules and a “red team” to test computers for vulnerabilities now being exploited with increasing sophistication and frequency by identity and credit card thieves, bank fraudsters, crime rings, and electronic spies.

By Keith Epstein
Provided by

art.hacker1.cnn.jpg 
The leader of these Chinese hackers says there “is always a weakness” on networks that allows cyber break-ins. 
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“We’re playing a giant game of chess now and we’re losing badly,” says commission member Tom Kellermann, a former World Bank security official who now is vice president of Security Awareness at Core Security.

Obama seems on board

Kellermann should know: He had a hand in crafting the nation’s cybersecurity strategy in 2003. But as he tells it, government efforts led by the Homeland Security Dept. have been stymied by bureaucratic confusion and an unwillingness by agencies and corporations to share information about cyber break-ins.

The commission’s report catalogues incidents afflicting financial institutions, large corporations, and government agencies, including some first detailed publicly over the last year in various BusinessWeek articles. In an ominous note for the private sector, the commission notes that “senior representatives from the intelligence community told us they had conclusive evidence covertly obtained from foreign sources that U.S. companies have lost billions in intellectual property.” (For more on the spread of malicious software, read the New York Times article, “Thieves Winning Online War, Maybe Even in Your Computer.” )

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http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnfla
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