Archive for the ‘Governors’ Category

Mayors, Governors of Both Parties Favor Stimulus (Surprised?)

February 4, 2009

“It’s time to stop the bickering and start the tough negotiating to get this bill out to ensure that the American people in our cities get the relief that they need right now.”

That quote is from Los Angeles, California, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, a Democrat.

Most of America’s mayors and governors want the stimulus and they want it now.

Mayors and governors wanting more federal money should be no surprise to anyone.

The stimulus is a gold mine of money for mayors and governors that don’t have to raise taxes to pay for the goodies the stimulus might buy and they have no requirement to repay the federal money.

Giving federal money to mayors and governors is like giving away Christmas presents — few strings are attached.

No surprise that both Democratic and Republican mayors and governors like money with no strings and no re-payment plan.

The case in Vermont is pretty much the case everywhere else.

“As the executive of a state experiencing budget challenges, [Vermont] Gov. Douglas has a different perspective on the situation than congressional Republicans,” said Douglas’ deputy chief of staff, Dennise Casey.

Yup.  Vermont needs money.  The Feds have money.  And Vermont wants to have it “no strings attached.”

But there is some concern that giving away money could be like giving away cocaine: the user never wants to stop.

The U.S. Senate has some worries the average mayor and governor may not stay awake  thinking over.

The Senate does worry that the money give-away will become addictive, even though the president himself said it had to be stimulating and “temporary.”

The Senate will also have to figure how to repay the loans that will finance the stimulus — which will cause a huge increase to the national debt which may cause inflation and other problems.

The Senate also has to come up for the cash for lots of other goodies like social security, health care, defense and on and on.

Mayors and governors are users here: so its a a non-story that they favor the stimulus.  We just don’t want them to become junkies….

Most of the mayors and governors are also Democrats, just as most members of the House and Senate are Democrats.  And the president is a Democrat swept into the White House by a big margin.  So what we have in the stimulus is the very danger of a one-party dominant American system….come true….

Related from CNN:
Mayors Love the Stimulus
http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/0
2/04/mayors.economy/index.html

Governors:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/2009013
1/ap_on_go_co/stimulus_gop_governors

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/2
7998219

Stimulus Congress

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi listens to National Governors Association chairman Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, second from right, during a meeting with National Governors Association vice chairman Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas, left, and Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., right, on Capitol Hill. Photo: Susan Walsh / AP
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GOP governors press Congress to pass stimulus bill

January 31, 2009

Most Republican governors have broken with their GOP colleagues in Congress and are pushing for passage of President Barack Obama‘s economic aid plan that would send billions to states for education, public works and health care.

Their state treasuries drained by the financial crisis, governors would welcome the money from Capitol Hill, where GOP lawmakers are more skeptical of Obama’s spending priorities.

Related:
Obama Week 3: Senate Poised to Defeat Stimulus?

The 2008 GOP vice presidential nominee, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, planned to meet in Washington this weekend with Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and other senators to press for her state’s share of the package.

By BETH FOUHY, Associated Press Writer

Florida Gov. Charlie Crist worked the phones last week with members of his state’s congressional delegation, including House Republicans. Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas, the Republican vice chairman of the National Governors Association, planned to be in Washington on Monday to urge the Senate to approve the plan.

“As the executive of a state experiencing budget challenges, Gov. Douglas has a different perspective on the situation than congressional Republicans,” said Douglas’ deputy chief of staff, Dennise Casey.

Not a single Republican voted with the majority last week when the House approved Obama’s $819 billion combination of tax cuts and new spending. The president’s goal is to create or preserve 3 million to 4 million jobs.

Republicans led by House Minority Leader John Boehner of Ohio complained that the plan is laden with pet projects and will not yield the jobs or stimulate the economy in the way Obama has promised.

The measure faces GOP opposition in the Senate, where it will be up for a vote in the week ahead.

But states are coping with severe budget shortfalls and mounting costs for Medicaid, the health insurance program for the poor. So governors, including most Republicans, are counting on the spending to help keep their states afloat.

This past week the bipartisan National Governors Association called on Congress to quickly pass the plan.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/200901
31/ap_on_go_co/stimulus_gop_governors

Related:
http://nobamablog.wordpress.com/200
9/01/31/is-the-stimulus-obama%E2%8
0%99s-iraq/

Should Illinois and New York Voters Be Pleased With Their Governor’s Appointments to the U.S. Senate?

January 24, 2009

Spare us the circus.  States should elect their U.S. Senators….

Two Governors recently made single-man selections of United States Senators — a practice voters should no longer tolerate.

Governors have the power to appoint “interim” Senators in cases such as when a seated and elected Senator’s dies.  But in each of these cases, there seems to have been ample time and reason to hold special elections to allow the people to decide who they wanted representing them in the United States Senate….

Related:
Burris Caper Highlights Bad Thinking of Congressional Democrats, Harry Reid

 Rethink Practice of Governors Filling Vacant U.S. Senate Seats

********

By BETH FOUHY, Associated Press Writer

The departure of four Democratic senators this year has cast a new — and at times, unflattering — light on governors and their power to fill Senate vacancies.

While governors must call a special election to replace members of the House who resign or die before their term is up, 38 states allow governors the sole power to appoint an interim senator, according to the National Council of State Legislatures.

Just nine states require a special election to fill a Senate vacancy. In three other states — Hawaii, Utah and Wyoming — governors must select a candidate from a list of prospective appointees submitted by representatives of the departing incumbent’s political party.

Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich makes a statement at a news conference ... 
Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich makes a statement at a news conference Friday, Jan. 23, 2009 in Chicago, as the Illinois Senate prepares for a trial that could remove him from office.The two term Governor was impeached by the Illinois House on a wide array of offenses including criminal corruption and wasting taxpayers money. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

Choosing a new senator has led to considerable drama for the four governors tasked with doing so this year. All have weathered some level of opprobrium for their choices or for how they handled the selection, with one — Rod Blagojevich of Illinois — facing criminal charges for trying to barter President Barack Obama‘s former seat for cash and favors.

“Politically, the choices made by the governors so far have been pretty odd,” said Seth Masket, an assistant professor of political science at the University of Denver.

Most recently, New York Gov. David Paterson engaged in a messy, drawn-out effort to name a replacement for Hillary Rodham Clinton, Obama’s secretary of state. The process was largely dominated by a high-profile lobbying campaign by Caroline Kennedy, the 51-year-old daughter of President John F. Kennedy hoping to win the nod.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090124/a
p_on_el_se/appointing_senators

New York Gov. David Paterson, seen here in 2008, has chosen ... 
New York Gov. David Paterson, seen here in 2008, has chosen state congresswoman Kirsten Gillibrand, a relative unknown on the political scene, to fill the Senate seat vacated by Hillary Clinton, US media said Friday.(AFP/Getty Images/File/Chris Hondros)