Archive for the ‘human trafficking’ Category

Vietnam, Thailand join forces to combat human trafficking

January 10, 2009

VietNamNet Bridge – Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung approved an agreement regarding future cooperation between Vietnam and Thailand in the fight against the trafficking of humans, particularly women and children, on Jan. 8.

The compact, which was signed by both governments in Hanoi on March 24, 2008, also covers means of coordination in assisting the victims of human trafficking.

PM Dung assigned the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to conduct ratification procedures and inform the necessary ministries, sectors and agencies of the details of the agreement.

The Ministry of Public Security has been entrusted with working alongside all relevant ministries, agencies and localities to ensure effective implementation of the pact.

(Source: VNA)

Human Trafficking For Sex In The U.S.

January 9, 2009
She testifies in federal court how a group of immigrants duped her into coming to the U.S., forced her to sell herself and kept her captive.
By Scott Glover
Los Angeles Times
January 9, 2009
When Sandra agreed to make the perilous trek from her native Guatemala to the United States in 2006, she said, she was lured by the prospect of a job as a housekeeper that would enable her to send money to her impoverished family back home.

Her father had a hernia that prevented him from working, and money was so tight that she and her 12 siblings sometimes didn’t have shoes or enough to eat, the young woman testified Thursday in federal court in Los Angeles.

But not long after Sandra was delivered to L.A. by human-smuggling “coyotes,” she learned that the job awaiting her had nothing to do with cleaning houses.

Instead, she said, she was told that she would have to “lay with men.”

“Did you understand you were going to be working as a prostitute?” asked Assistant U.S. Atty. Cheryl Murphy.

“I did not know what that word was,” Sandra responded through a Spanish-language translator. “Now I do.”

Related:
Vietnam’s Government Going Into Wife Selling Business?
.
Asian Human Trafficking, Torture and Sex Trade

Read the rest:
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-sext
raffic9-2009jan09,0,133445.story

Vietnam’s Government Going Into Wife Selling Business?

January 8, 2009

Vietnam says it is planning to set up an official matchmaking agency to arrange marriages between Vietnamese women and foreign men.

The authorities say they want to regulate the sector, which they say is currently run by illegal groups.

Police have targeted events in recent years where dozens of women from poor backgrounds, seeking a better life, are paraded before potential suitors.

The men are often on short “marriage holidays” from South Korea and Taiwan.

BBC

Correspondents say that overseas marriage is seen by some women in Vietnam as a route out of poverty and the practice is widespread in some rural areas.

But many women fall foul of unscrupulous brokers and are sold into prostitution, while others are forced into marriages they do not want.

Vietnamese officials have now been told to make plans for a state-controlled matchmaking firm based in Ho Chi Minh City.

Read the rest from the BBC:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7817818.stm

Related:
Human Trafficking For Sex In The U.S.

Asian Human Trafficking, Torture and Sex Trade

January 3, 2009

Western men who visit red-light districts in poor countries often find themselves surrounded by coquettish teenage girls laughingly tugging them toward the brothels. The men assume that the girls are there voluntarily, and in some cases they are right.

But anyone inclined to take the girls’ smiles at face value should talk to Sina Vann, who was once one of those smiling girls.

By Nicholas Kristof
The New York Times

Nicholas D. Kristof/The New York Times

Above: Sina Vann

Sina is Vietnamese but was kidnapped at the age of 13 and taken to Cambodia, where she was drugged. She said she woke up naked and bloody on a bed with a white man — she doesn’t know his nationality — who had purchased her virginity.

After that, she was locked on the upper floors of a nice hotel and offered to Western men and wealthy Cambodians. She said she was beaten ferociously to force her to smile and act seductive.

“My first phrase in Khmer,” the Cambodian language, “was, ‘I want to sleep with you,’ ” she said. “My first phrase in English was” — well, it’s unprintable.

Read the rest:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/01/opinion
/01kristof.html?scp=1&sq=Cambodia%20,%20
sex%20trafficking&st=cse

Child trafficking spreads from Africa to US

December 29, 2008

Late at night, the neighbors saw a little girl at the kitchen sink of the house next door. They watched through their window as the child rinsed plates under the open faucet. She wasn’t much taller than the counter and the soapy water swallowed her slender arms.

To put the dishes away, she climbed on a chair.

Shyima Hall, 19, discusses her domestic enslavement Tuesday, ... 
Shyima Hall, 19, discusses her domestic enslavement Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008, in Beaumont, Calif. Shyima was 10 when a wealthy Egyptian couple brought her from a poor village in Northern Egypt to work in their California home. She awoke before dawn and often worked past midnight to iron their clothes, mop the marble floors and dust the family’s crystal. She earned $45 a month working up to 20 hours a day. The trafficking of children for domestic labor in the United States is an extension of an illegal but common practice among the upper class in Africa.(AP Photo/Ric Francis)

But she was not the daughter of the couple next door doing chores. She was their maid.

Shyima was 10 when a wealthy Egyptian couple brought her from a poor village in northern Egypt to work in their California home. She awoke before dawn and often worked past midnight to iron their clothes, mop the marble floors and dust the family’s crystal. She earned $45 a month working up to 20 hours a day. She had no breaks during the day and no days off.

The trafficking of children for domestic labor in the U.S. is an extension of an illegal but common practice in Africa. Families in remote villages send their daughters to work in cities for extra money and the opportunity to escape a dead-end life. Some girls work for free on the understanding that they will at least be better fed in the home of their employer.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081229/a
p_on_re_af/the_slave_next_door

Cambodia’s problems with new sex trafficking law

December 27, 2008

Chantha said there was nothing else she could do in Cambodia but become a prostitute.

“If you don’t even have a dollar in your pocket to buy rice, how can you bear looking at your starving relatives?” she said.

“You do whatever to survive, until you start to realize the consequence of your deeds.”

by Kounila Keo
AFP

Cambodian sex workers in Phnom Penh. Chantha says there was ... 
Cambodian sex workers in Phnom Penh. Chantha says there was nothing else she could do in Cambodia but become a prostitute(AFP/File/Tang Chhin Sothy)

Chanta, in her early twenties, was working in a small red-light district west of the capital Phnom Penh several months ago when she was arrested under Cambodia‘s new sex-trafficking law.

Police nabbed her in a raid and charged her with publicly soliciting sex, fining her nearly two dollars. Then, Chanta claims, the arresting officers gang raped and beat her for six days in detention.

Bruises covered her body, but none of her assailants were brought to court, she said.

The Cambodian government began prosecuting a new “Law on Suppression of Human Trafficking and Sexual Exploitation” in February after years of pressure from the United States to clamp down on sex trafficking.

Since then, authorities have conducted brothel raids and street sweeps, but rights groups complain the new law has in many ways worsened the exploitation of women.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081226/lf_afp/cambodia
prostitutiontrafficking_081226040116

The Congress and Historic Anti-Trafficking Legislation

December 16, 2008

On Dec. 10, Congress passed historic anti-trafficking legislation. The Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA) passed both the House and the Senate within several hours. That timely victory was more than two years in the making and represents the triumph of one man’s passion and a broad coalition’s power.

It is safe to say the legislation would not exist without the wholehearted passion and the incredible commitment, dedication, skill and determination of Michael Horowitz, a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute, who has for more than a decade presided over a loose, broad-based coalition of left-right activists who unite in opposition to human slavery and exploitation but differ on almost every other issue. Keeping that group of diverse leaders united and focused is in itself a monumental accomplishment. But satisfying the different expectations required a rare level of expertise indeed.

By Janice Shaw Crouse
The Washington Times

It is also safe to say the legislative victory would have been impossible without the grass-roots involvement of organizations like Concerned Women for America and the Southern Baptist Convention – two conservative groups that have been intimately and extensively involved in the nitty-gritty lobbying and negotiating essential to passage of the legislation. It is rare for conservative groups to get headlines for their involvement in what is commonly referred to as “social justice” issues, yet CWA, the Southern Baptists, and the Salvation Army, along with many other evangelical organizations, are usually found in the trenches when such battles are being waged, whether domestically or internationally. Certainly, in the fight against commercial sexual exploitation and labor slavery, conservative leaders are essential to success.

Further, this legislation is an outstanding achievement of the Bush administration, who first called the crime of human trafficking “modern-day slavery.” From the outset, President Bush was an outspoken champion of those who are sexually exploited and used as a commercial commodity. He spoke at the United Nations and on national broadcasts about the necessity for protecting women and girls entrapped by the criminal networks who traffic in human beings. No doubt, Mr. Bush’s support of anti-trafficking efforts will be a major legacy of the Bush administration.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/20
08/dec/16/a-block-to-human-trafficking/