Archive for the ‘Jenkins’ Category

Obama, Notre Dame, Abortion Controversy Won’t Easily Die

March 27, 2009

Another bishop has sent a letter to the president of the University of Notre Dame urging him to rethink inviting President Obama to the university to recieve an award.

Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted of the Diocese of Phoenix wrote the letter to Father John Jenkins to say, “I am saddened and heavy of heart about your decision to invite President Obama to speak at Notre Dame University.”

Photo of Fr. John Jenkins, C.S.C.
Fr. Jenkins

The controversey erupted when a petition was circulated to express displeasure at the pro-abortion Obama’s trip to Notre Dame planned for May 2009.

Some Catholics say Obama should not have been invited to speak at the Catholic university’s commencement because of his pro-choice stance on the issue of abortion and his decision to permit federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research.

Over 188,000 people have put their names on the online petition (as of Friday morning March 27):
http://www.notredamescandal.com/

Olmsted’s letter follows a statement earlier this week by Notre Dame’s own Bishop John D’Arcy, in which the bishop criticized the decision and announced his intent to boycott the ceremony. 

Just about a year ago, Father jenkins came under fire at Notre dame for allowing the show “The Vagina Monologues” on campus.

At that time he said, “I am very determined that we not suppress speech on this campus,” Father Jenkins said in a statement. “I am also determined that we never suppress or neglect the Gospel that inspired this university.”

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Dear Fr. Jenkins,

I am saddened and heavy of heart about your decision to invite President Obama to speak at Notre Dame University and even to receive an honorary degree.

It is a public act of disobedience to the Bishops of the United States.  Our USCCB June 2004 Statement “Catholics in Political Life” states: “The Catholic community and Catholic institutions should not honor those who act in defiance of our fundamental moral principles.  They should not be given awards, honors or platforms which would suggest support for their actions.”  No one could not know of the public stands and actions of the president on key issues opposed to the most vulnderable human beings.

John Paul II said, “Above all, the common outcry, which is justly made on behalf of human rights – for example, the right to health, to home, to work, to family, to culture – is false and illusory if the right to life, the most basic and fundamental right and the condition for all other personal rights, is not defended with the maximum determination.”

I pray that you come to see the grave mistake of your decision, and the way that it undercuts the Church’s proclamation of the Gospel of Life in our day.

Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted
Diocese of Phoenix

Related:
http://www.southbendtribune.com/apps/p
bcs.dll/article?AID=/20090326/News01
/903260347

Obama’s Views Cause Troubles Between Notre Dame, Bishop, Many Catholics

 Bishop: Notre Dame has ‘chosen prestige over truth’ by inviting Obama

80,000 Sign Petition to Withdraw Invite to Obama

The University of Notre Dame says its invitation doesn't mean the university agrees with all of Obama's positions.

The University of Notre Dame says its invitation doesn’t mean the university agrees with all of Obama’s positions.

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By Tom Coyne
Associated Press

Jimmy Carter came to Notre Dame in 1977. So did Ronald Reagan in 1981 and George W. Bush in 2001.

The University of Notre Dame has a tradition of inviting new presidents to speak at graduation. But this year’s selection of President Barack Obama has been met by a barrage of criticism that has left some students fearing their commencement ceremony will turn into a circus.

Many Catholics are angered by Obama’s planned appearance at the May 17 ceremony because of his decisions to provide federal funding for embryonic stem cell research and international family planning groups that provide abortions or educate about the procedure.

The consensus Thursday on the campus of the nation’s largest Catholic university was that any president should be welcomed at Notre Dame.

“People are definitely entitled to their outrage, but I think the main thing is to see that it’s an honor to have the president of the United States come to speak here whether you agree with him or not,” said Katie Woodward, a political science junior from Philadelphia.

Justin Mack, a senior film major from Dallas, agreed.

“I didn’t vote for him and there are a lot of things I don’t agree with him or support. But I feel like for this event people need to put that aside,” said Mack, a senior film major from Dallas. “My hope is that doesn’t distract too much from what the weekend is about, which is the graduation.”

But the distractions have been mounting, including sharply worded letters from two bishops. Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted of the Phoenix Diocese on Wednesday called Obama’s selection a “public act of disobedience” and “a grave mistake.” On Tuesday, Bishop John D’Arcy of the Fort Wayne-South Bend Diocese, which includes Notre Dame, said he would not attend the ceremony because of Obama’s policies.

Hundreds of people on both sides of the issue have sent letters to the student newspaper, and a coalition of conservative student groups has announced its opposition.

University spokesman Dennis Brown says Notre Dame does not plan to rescind the invitation. Anyone associated with the university can recommend a commencement speaker, he said, and the president consults with university officers to see who would be most appropriate.

Notre Dame President Rev. John Jenkins has said the university does not condone all of Obama’s policies but that it’s important to engage in conversation.

White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said Thursday that Obama believes everyone has the right to express their opinion, saying the president met last week with Chicago Cardinal Francis George and others to discuss topics Obama and the Catholic church are interested in.

“He looks forward to continuing that dialogue in the leadup to the commencement, and looks forward to delivering the address in May,” Gibbs said.

Bob Reish, the student body president and a graduating senior, said there is a “general excitement” about Obama’s visit, although he is aware there are people on both sides of the issue.

As of 2 p.m. Thursday, The Observer, the student newspaper, had received 612 letters about Obama’s appearance – 313 from alumni and 299 from current students.

Seventy percent of the alumni letters opposed having Obama giving the speech, while 73 percent of student letters supported his appearance. Among the 95 seniors who wrote letters, 97 percent supported the president’s invitation.

Sophomore Kelsey Fletcher, a Japanese major from nearby Elkhart, said she doesn’t think the university should have invited Obama to speak.

“He shouldn’t be giving the commencement address because of his policies, but once you invite him you can’t disinvite him,” she said. “That would be rude.”

Others noted that Obama is only speaking at three universities this year.

“We can’t just forgive his viewpoints, we can’t just let it go without expressing our thoughts on it,” said Thomas Heitker, a freshman biology major from Columbus, Ohio. “But he’s only speaking at three universities this year and to be one out of so many is something we should be proud about.”

Chris Carrington, a political science major from the Chicago area, said he doesn’t see how Obama’s appearance at Notre Dame contradicts Catholic values.

“To not allow someone here because of their beliefs seems a little hypocritical and contradictory to what the mission of the university and church should be,” he said.

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