Archive for the ‘murder’ Category

Top U.S. Military Leader Offers Help to Mexico; Briefs Obama

March 7, 2009

The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said the United States could help with equipment and intelligence techniques after returning from a six-day trip to Latin America punctuated by news of beheadings and intimidation by Mexican drug cartels.

Mexico could borrow from U.S. tactics in the fight against terrorism as it battles a crisis of drug-related violence along the U.S.-Mexico border, the top U.S. military officer said Friday.

Returning from a six-day trip to Latin America punctuated by news of beheadings and intimidation by Mexican drug cartels, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said the United States could help with equipment and intelligence techniques.

Adm. Mike Mullen would not be specific about what kind of intelligence or surveillance help the United States might offer, but said he saw ways to employ experience the United States has gained in the ongoing hunt for extremists and terrorists.

He would not say whether there may already be U.S. drones flying over bloodstained cities such as Ciudad Juarez, where 17 bodies came into the morgue on one day recently, including the city police force’s second-in-command and three other officers.

“Obviously it affects us because of the relationship between the two countries,” Mullen said during a telephone news conference as he flew to Washington following meetings in Mexico, his last stop.

Mullen referred to the spike in violence as a crisis, and said it occupied much of his discussions with Mexican military leaders.

More than 1,000 people have been killed in Mexico in drug-related violence this year. In 2008, the toll doubled from the previous year to 6,290. Both the U.S. and Canada have warned that murders related to drug activity in certain parts of Mexico, particularly along the border with the U.S., raised the level of risk in visiting the country.

There are signs the violent competition among Mexican drug and smuggling cartels is spilling across the border, as cities in Arizona report increases in such crimes as home invasions. More than 700 people were arrested as part of a wide-ranging crackdown on Mexican drug cartels operating inside the United States, the Justice Department said last month.

Last weekend, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said he also saw opportunities for the U.S. military to help with military training, resources and intelligence.

“I think we are beginning to be in a position to help the Mexicans more than we have in the past. Some of the old biases against cooperation with our — between our militaries and so on, I think, are being set aside,” Gates said in an interview that aired last Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

“It clearly is a serious problem,” he said.

Related:
http://eideard.wordpress.com/2009/03/08/o
bama-mullen-discuss-mexicos-drug-wars/

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By ANNE GEARAN, AP Military Writer

President Barack Obama was briefed Saturday by Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen about the drug wars in Mexico and wanted to know how the United States can help.

“Clearly one of the things the president was interested in was the U.S military capability that may or may not apply to our cooperation with the Mexicans,” said a U.S. military official who requested anonymity because the discussions were private. “He was very interested in what kind of military capabilities may be applied.”

Mullen briefed Obama Saturday morning about discussions with Mexican military leaders about the drug wars there.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/2009030
8/ap_on_go_pr_wh/us_mexico_9

Related:
http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/america
s/03/07/mexico.headless.bodies/index.html

http://mexicoinstitute.wordpress.com/200
9/03/03/factbox-ciudad-juarez-mexicos-m
ost-violent-city/

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Torture, Murder of Top Mexican Anti-Drug Man; “Out of Control” Drug War

February 4, 2009

The ugly nature of the drug war in Mexico will not subside.

Retired Gen. Mauro Enrique Tello Quiñonez, his aide and a driver were tortured.  They had many broken bones, bruises and burn marks on their skin.

State prosecutor of Quintana Roo, Bello Melchor Rodriguez y Carrillo, said “The general was the most mistreated.  He had burns on his skin and bones in his hands and wrists were broken.”

The general took over as the top anti-drug man in the area just 24 hours before his death.

A U.S. FBI agent that advises the Mexican Police told us, “The drug war is out of control here.  No rules.”

The U.S. military said recently said the drug war could cause the Mexican government to collapse.  There is now a rising tide of dead judges, mayors and police — all killed by drug cartels and many tortured.

According to official figures, at least 72 military officers have died in anti-drug raids in Mexico since December 2006, when President Felipe Calderon declared war against drug trafficking.

Related:
CNN:
http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/americas
/02/04/mexico.general/index.html

America Closer To A Lawless Neighbor, Drug Cartel Rules Border

 Mexico: Top Cops Bribed By Drug Cartel

 Mexico: “under sustained assault”; Could “collapse” — U.S. Military

Iran Conducting Mass Hangings

January 22, 2009

Iran hanged 22 convicted criminals in mass executions on Tuesday and Wednesday in Tehran and few other cities, official news media reported.

By Nazila Fathi
The New York Times

Iran has the highest number of executions in the world after China. Crimes such as murder, drug trafficking, armed robbery, rape and adultery are punished by execution.

The state run television news reported Thursday that 10 men were hanged in Tehran’s Evin prison on Wednesday. The semi-official Fars news agency reported that an 11th man, scheduled to be executed in February, witnessed the hanging of the 10.

The Iranian press accounts said the convicts included a drug addict who murdered his aunt and a robber who killed a cab driver.

Read the rest:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/23/
world/middleeast/23iran.html

Democratic Pakistan Limps On

December 25, 2008

Pakistan returned to civilian rule shortly after the assassination of Benazir Bhutto a year ago, but the nascent democracy is now caught in a web of crises that is threatening its future, analysts say.

The government led by President Asif Ali Zardari, Bhutto’s widower, came to power with significant public support, but many say he has not lived up to the promises made by their slain leader before her death in a suicide attack.

“He seems to have lost some of the popular goodwill because the government appears to be ineffective in addressing the problems that have hit the common people most,” political analyst Hasan Askari told AFP.

By Rana Jawad
AFP

Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari. Pakistan returned to civilian ... 
Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari. Pakistan returned to civilian rule shortly after the assassination of Benazir Bhutto a year ago, but the nascent democracy is now caught in a web of crises that is threatening its future, analysts say.(AFP/File/Sezayi Erken)

Pakistan’s troubles have worsened in the past 12 months with more than 50 suicide attacks killing civilians, severe economic woes for the government, and high food prices and regular power shortages hitting ordinary families hard.

At the same time, militancy in the lawless tribal areas and simmering tensions with India have been accompanied by political infighting between the ruling Pakistan People’s Party (PPP) and its former coalition partner.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081224/wl_sthas
ia_afp/pakistanattacksbhuttoanniversarypolitic
s_081224062445

Related:
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapcf/12/26/un.pakistan/index.html