Archive for the ‘Pearl Harbor’ Category

Obasm: “It took us a couple of days,” Yet FDR Got Pearl Harbor Right and Fast

March 25, 2009

When someone is on top of the facts; he doesn’t need a teleprompter.

And when a person has deeply seated values and ideals, he doesn’t need to wait to see what the polls will say.

Ed Henry should get an award for eliciting the truth from the president last night about his slow response to the AIG bonus caper. 

“It took us a couple of days because I like to know what I’m talking about before I speak,” the president said.

Maybe he wants to know what to think.

What Obama left out is this: we at the White House also like to take a poll, write crafty remarks and get them into the teleprompter, before we say anything.

FDR reponded faster and better to Pearl Harbor.  He was on top of the facts and at the top of his game.  And he got it right.

I’m calling this Ed Henry response an “Obasm” as in Barack Obama blurting out the truth.

Obama didn’t know what to say about the AIG bonuses.  The stimulus bill allowed them and Geithner, Bernanke and their boys knew about them for months maybe.

Once publically disclosed, the president needed two days to decide what to say.  Then he faked “outrage.”  Then the House voted a 90% confiscatory tax on the bonuses and the president changed course: maybe he was too hasty after two days because he still got it wrong.

I’ll take FDR or Lincoln.  Even without the teleprompter and the polls they knew what they were doing and we knew what to expect.

The reason we want impromptu appearances and remarks by the President of the United States, any president (and all other elected officials) is this: voters need to know how their elected officials really think — and what they really think.

We wants our elected officals off the telepromter and away from the polling data: we want them to speak from the heart and mean it.

I’m not sure we’ve ever seen Barack Obama speak from the heart.  Everything is scripted.  When his pastor raised eyebrows: he lied about the relationship.  Now he has three pastors; not because he believes all three but because, I think, he can’t afford the nighmare scenario that one might not meet with public approval….

When teased about his telepromter: this president got a bigger one……

http://michellemalkin.com/2009/03
/25/president-snippy-the-video/

Related:
 President, Congress, Media “Vacant” in Time of Crisis

Teleprompter White House: Packaged People, Messages

Obama Throws In The Towel

 After Leno, Laughter on “60 Minutes,” Boredom From “No Drama” Obama

Obama Once Ruled the Media: Now He Wants To Reach You With Less Of Them

Telepromter President Goes Jumbotron!

 
Lurching toward what?

Advertisements

Warren Buffett says US in ‘economic Pearl Harbor’

January 19, 2009

Billionaire investor Warren Buffett says the U.S. is engaged in an “economic Pearl Harbor.

In an interview that aired Sunday on “Dateline NBC,” the chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. said the nation’s economic situation is not as bad at World War II or the Great Depression, but it’s still pretty severe.

Associated Press

Buffett said Americans are in a cycle of fear, “which leads to people not wanting to spend and not wanting to make investments, and that leads to more fear. We’ll break out of it. It takes time.”

Buffett’s interview centered on President-elect Barack Obama and the tough task he faces in fixing the U.S. economy.

“You couldn’t have anybody better in charge,” the Omaha resident said of Obama, who’ll be sworn into office on Tuesday.

As one of Obama’s economic advisers, Buffett said the president-elect listens to what his advisers say, but ultimately comes up with better ideas.

He predicted that Obama will be able to convey the severity of the economic situation to the American people and explain their part in alleviating it.

As to how long the crisis would continue, Buffett said he didn’t know.

“It’s never paid to bet against America,” he said. “We come through things, but its not always a smooth ride.”

Witnesses recall attack on Pearl Harbor

December 7, 2008

Sixty-seven years after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, Edward K. Walker Jr. of Alexandria still “vividly” remembers watching the bombs fall, with little understanding then of the infamous role the event would play in history.

“I just climbed up on the roof to see what was happening, much to my mother’s consternation,” said Mr. Walker, who was 9 at the time. “I didn’t really know what was happening. I just thought it was interesting to watch.”

Mr. Walker, the son of a naval officer stationed at Pearl Harbor, later spent 38 years in the Navy, retiring in 1988 as a rear admiral.

He is one of a dwindling number of people who witnessed the forces of Imperial Japan nearly deliver their intended knockout blow to the U.S. Pacific Fleet at its Hawaiian base on Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941. Some of them will be present for the annual wreath-laying at the Navy Memorial on Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest in remembrance of those who died.  

By Timothy Warren
The Washington Times
.

In this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo, the battleship USS Arizona ...
In this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo, the battleship USS Arizona belches smoke as it topples over into the sea during a Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. With an eye on the immediate aftermath of the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, thousands of World War II veterans and other observers are expected on Sunday, Dec. 7, 2008 to commemorate the 67th anniversary of the devastating Japanese military raid.(AP Photo)


Cmdr. John Budzik, U.S. Navy retired, was about 28 when the attack on Pearl Harbor took place. He was stationed at Honolulu Harbor, about 10 miles away from Pearl Harbor, and he saw and heard the explosions. “We didn’t know what was happening, even then,” he says. Later he and his men had to collect debris from the explosions. This image was made Friday, Dec. 5, 2008. (Barbara L. Salisbury / The Washington Times)

While Mr. Walker was just a boy, former Commander John Budzik was 25 then, and he can remember feeling the fear sparked by the shocking attack that pushed the United States into World War II.

Mr. Budzik, 92, was awakened early that morning by the first wave of attacks, mostly from torpedo bombers, and immediately rushed to his post at Honolulu Harbor, about 10 miles away from Pearl Harbor, where he was in charge of opening and closing the gates for entering submarines.

“It was just frightening,” said Mr. Budzik. “We didn’t know if there would be any more attacks or where they would come from. It was a very scary experience.”

After the attack, Mr. Budzik was made commanding officer of the USS Ash, where he was in charge of placing and maintaining anti-submarine and anti-torpedo nets in harbors around the Hawaiian, Midway and New Caledonia islands. Mr. Budzik eventually would command another ship, the USS Abele, to Iwo Jima, where he would witness the famous flag-raising.

Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremonies, such as  today’s….

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2008
/dec/07/pearl-harbor-remembered/

Pearl Harbor, 67 Years Ago Sunday: Heroes Remembered

December 6, 2008

Thousands of World War II veterans and other observers are expected to commemorate the 67th anniversary of the devastating 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor tomorrow.

The theme of the event, “Pacific War Memories: The Heroic Response to Pearl Harbor,” is something of a departure from the past.

In this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo, American ships burn during ... 
I this Dec. 7, 1941 photo, American ships burn during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. With an eye on the immediate aftermath of the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, thousands of World War II veterans and other observers are expected on Sunday, Dec. 7, 2008 to commemorate the 67th anniversary of the devastating Japanese military raid.(AP Photo)

The commemoration usually focuses on the attack on the USS Arizona, Pearl Harbor and several other installations on Oahu.

But this year, the focus will center more on the months following the raid.

In this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo, the battleship USS Arizona ... 
In this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo, the battleship USS Arizona belches smoke as it topples over into the sea during a Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. With an eye on the immediate aftermath of the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, thousands of World War II veterans and other observers are expected on Sunday, Dec. 7, 2008 to commemorate the 67th anniversary of the devastating Japanese military raid.(AP Photo)

One of the speakers will be Thomas Griffin, who answered the Pearl Harbor attack four months later with an aircraft carrier-launched bomber raid on Tokyo.

The B-25 mission inflicted little damage to Japan but boosted morale in America.

It led the embarrassed Japanese government to launch what turned out to be an ill-fated attack on Midway Island.


USS Hornet launched the B-25 attack on Japan in 1942

From the Associated Press

Japanese zero.jpg

One of the American heroes of December 7, 1941 was Doris “Dorie” Miller.  He was awarded the Navy Cross for his heroic action that day.  He fought the Japanese along side his Commanding Officer, Captain Mervyn Bennion of the USS West Virginia:

“For distinguished devotion to duty, extraordinary courage and disregard for his own personal safety during the attack on the Fleet in Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, by Japanese forces on December 7, 1941. While at the side of his Captain on the bridge, Miller, despite enemy strafing and bombing and in the face of a serious fire, assisted in moving his Captain, who had been mortally wounded, to a place of greater safety, and later manned and operated a machine gun directed at enemy Japanese attacking aircraft until ordered to leave the bridge.”

   
****

In this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo, a  small boat rescues a USS ... 
In this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo, a small boat rescues a USS West Virginia crew member from the water after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. With an eye on the immediate aftermath of the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, thousands of World War II veterans and other observers are expected on Sunday, Dec. 7, 2008 to commemorate the 67th anniversary of the devastating Japanese military raid.

Captain Bennion of USS West Virginia was awarded the Medal of Honor (posthumously).

Mervyn Sharp Bennion

Captain Bennion’s citation:

For conspicuous devotion to duty, extraordinary courage, and complete disregard of his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, during the attack on the Fleet in Pearl Harbor, by Japanese forces on 7 December 1941. As Commanding Officer of the USS West Virginia, after being mortally wounded, Capt. Bennion evidenced apparent concern only in fighting and saving his ship, and strongly protested against being carried from the bridge.”


USS Bennion was named for Captain Bennion in 1943.


USS Miller was named for Dorie Miller in 1973