Archive for the ‘PLO’ Category

Abbas Says He Runs Gaza, Not Hamas

February 2, 2009

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas said on Sunday that he will not hold reconciliation talks with the rival Hamas group unless it accepts his authority.

That may not be easy as Hamas is the elected government of Gaza.

And the exiled leader of Hamas, Khaled Mashaal, directly challenged the Palestinian Authority president’s power Wednesday, saying the group of Palestinian factions led by Abbas – known as the PLO – “in its current state is no authority.”

Today Abbas discussed the matter with Egypt’s President Mubarak in Cairo.

Hamas also has a group of diplomats in Cairo today to discuss the cease fire with Israel.

Jerusalem Post:
http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=123
3304655299&pagename=JPost%2FJPArticle%2
FShowFull

CNN:
http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/me
ast/02/01/egypt.hamas/index.html

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (R) talks with Palestinian ... 
Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak (R) talks with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas (C) and Saudi Arabia’s Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal during their meeting in Cairo February 2, 2009. Abbas on Sunday ruled out dialogue with Hamas unless it recognises the supremacy of the Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO), deepening the split between the two main Palestinian groups.REUTERS/Amr Dalsh (EGYPT)

Gaza: Hamas Was Dying, Now Israel Has Revived It….

December 30, 2008

In its efforts to stop amateur rockets from nagging the residents of some of its southern cities, Israel appears to have given new life to the fledging Islamic movement in Palestine.

By Daoud Kuttab
The Washington Post

For two years, the Islamic Resistance Movement (known by its Arabic acronym, Hamas) has been losing support internally and externally. This wasn’t the case in the days after the party came to power democratically in early 2006; despite being unjustly ostracized by the international community for its anti-Israeli stance, Hamas enjoyed the backing of Palestinians and other Arabs. Having won a decisive parliamentary majority on an anti-corruption platform promising change and reform, Hamas worked hard to govern better than had Fatah, its rival and predecessor.

Things began to sour when Hamas violently seized control of Gaza, but even then, Hamas enjoyed considerable domestic support — and much goodwill externally. Then the movement turned down every legitimate offer from its nationalist PLO rivals and Egyptian mediators to pursue reconciliation, and support for it began to slip.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/20
08/12/29/AR2008122901901.html?hpid=opinionsbox1