Archive for the ‘Republicans’ Category

Leave The Lights On: There’s Work To Do That Is Worth Doing, Even If We’re Tired

March 28, 2009

I am tired of meaningless, symbolic acts and endless political promises and blather and lack of taking responsibility in the year of the Oh-Bombastic.

I am tired of Barney Frank and Tim Geithner…..

And I am tired of just refusing to do the hard work to figure out how we could make America better.

This presidency has become “The Obama Show.”  When does he work and stop talking?

We’ll leave the lights on for THAT, Barack…..

If we work, and leave the lights on, and read and think we mights have some better ideas.

I fear Barack is talking to people with no lights on….

Here are a few more reasons to leave the lights on:

–To figure out how to handle global warming without ending productivity and growth in the USA….or anywhere else…
 U.N. ‘Climate Change’ Plan Would Likely Shift Trillions to Form New World Economy

This is a developing essay and not yet finished…..

–To figure out how to have health care reform without having health care rationing….
How Health Care Reform Can Kill Good Medicine

Natasha Richardson’s Story Saves Girl’s Life

–To figure out how to focus upon students and learning and not just teachers and money….

–To figure out, as we just passed the 30th anniversary of Three Mile Island, how to get past our fears of nuclear power (as the French have) and light up our world forever….We are not in the Jane Fonda world of the China Syndrome: just ask the U.S. Navy or any nation with nuclear power….

–To figure out when we’ll drill in the Arctic Reserve….safely… I mean we went to the moon and I am expected to believe Obama’s “Big Oil” lie that we can’t get money and oil out of Alaska without killing the planet?

–To figure out how to get the Republicans in America to wake the f &*^%$# up…….

–To teach the Congress why a 90% tax on anyone is a bad idea…..

Do we want to revive our economy, or do we want to punish the bankers?

As Joe Biden says, “Are you f ^%$#*& ing kidding me?”

I am tired of capers like the stimulus: my money gone and congress didn’t have time to read the bill and the president said it was a really super-duper crisis like all his others…. so we have NO HOPE of getting it right…. like Afgahanistan and now we have adopted Pakistan too?  I thought this was the anti-war president?

Obama Stimulus Job Numbers for Massachusetts “Manufactured in Washington DC”

I’m tired of class warfare….

Class Warfare? Obama Tears Down Rich Instead of Inspiring Others To Get Rich

I am tired of looking at my children and grandchildren while I know I am living a lie because they will have to pay off the debt someday….and my house is paid for…I’m talking about the Obamadebt….
The Democratic Congress’s Cover-Up; Our Biggest Danger

I’m tired of fakes who lip synch and are praised as entertainers…. and for giving a complete show….

Britney Spears delivers a complete show

Michelle Malkin:
http://michellemalkin.com/2009/0
3/28/leave-the-lights-on-celebrat
e-human-achievement-hour/


At the top of the U.S. government we have this guy, Obama, Nancy Pelosi and Joe Biden.  Really?

Congressional Republicans Still Struggle, Differ on Budget

March 28, 2009

Even before Barack Obama double-dared them to cough up their own budget, House Republican leaders were quietly drafting a set of conservative budget principles to convince voters – and their own rank-and-file – that they aren’t just The Party of No.

Minority Leader John Boehner, Minority Whip Eric Cantor, GOP Conference Chairman Mike Pence and Rep. Paul Ryan worked for weeks on a plan, staffers say, without any serious philosophical disagreements.

By &
Politico

But over time, Cantor-Ryan and Boehner-Pence camps split over questions of tactics and timing.

Pence, with Boehner’s blessing, wanted to unveil an abbreviated “blueprint” Thursday to counter Obama’s criticism and arm members with new talking points heading into this weekend – even if it meant that their plan wouldn’t have much in the way of details.

Cantor and Ryan wanted to wait until Ryan’s staff produced a fully-fleshed-out alternative to Obama’s $3.6 trillion spending plan, with specific numbers on spending and tax cuts – even if it meant waiting a few more days to get it out.

Cantor and Ryan ultimately caved in, and what they got was the worst of both worlds: a thin, glossy “blueprint” that was ridiculed by Democrats and cable news anchors, and a nasty internecine scrap that culminated with one GOP aide telling POLITICO that Pence had thrown Ryan “under the bus” in an “egocentric rush” to grab the spotlight.

Privately, some Republicans are worried that the split over the budget blueprint portends the kind of internal squabbling that afflicted the party during the height of its power at the beginning of the Bush administration.

“It was an unmitigated disaster,” said one House GOP aide of the Thursday roll-out. “We’ve got to figure out why this happened — and fix things fast.”

Thursday’s four-car pile-up wasn’t the first for the four GOP leaders. Six weeks ago, they were able to hold their conference together in two unanimous votes against the Democrats’ $787 billion stimulus package six weeks ago. But last week, the Boehner-Pence and Cantor-Ryan camps split publicly over publicly over the Democratic bill imposing a 90 percent tax on bonuses paid to executives at AIG and other bailed-out firms.

Read the rest:
http://www.politico.com/news/stori
es/0309/20577.html

******************

From CNN

Despite crushing defeats in the last two elections, Senate Republicans have new “energy and enthusiasm” for winning back the majority, according to their leader, Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.

“President Bush had become extremely unpopular, and politically he was sort of a millstone around our necks in both ’06 and ’08,” McConnell told reporters Friday. “We now have the opportunity to be on offense, offer our own ideas and we will win some.”

Many of those ideas get presented as amendments to Democratic bills, and even though they’re usually defeated, they can draw attention to GOP policy alternatives and force Democrats to take difficult votes.

“They become the way you chart the course for a comeback, which, in this country, always happens at some point,” McConnell said. “The pendulum swings.”

McConnell said many of the ideas for amendments come from conservative think tanks and other Republican thinkers off Capitol Hill.

“Newt Gingrich, for example, has an idea a minute. Many of those are quite good. Many of those become amendments,” he said.

McConnell also said he doesn’t mind the “party of no” label Congressional Democrats and the White House give Republicans.

Read the rest:
http://edition.cnn.com/2009/POLITIC
S/03/27/gop.comeback/index.html

Heard Obama Say “Bipartisan” Lately?

March 26, 2009

There was a time, a long long time ago, and in a land far away, that Barack Obama spoke about “bipartisanship.”

He never really gave it a chance and didn’t seem to get the hang of it though.  But that could be because he wasn’t a senator long enough to get the hang of it and his Chief of Staff, Rahm Emanuel, is about as bipartisan as Attila the Hun.

After the words “I won” and “never let a good crisis go to waste” were uttered, well, it has been “all Obama all the time.”

Just recently its been Obama on Leno, Obama on “60 Minutes,” Obama in a press conference of dubious value, and today, Obama on the Internet which looked like just an opportunity for the president to get away from real work and campaign — which he is very good at and has a tireless yen for….

So, with Democrats in control of the House and the Senate, who needs those other guys?

Well, lets hope there are no further crises in the future because the bipartisanship we have seen so far won’t buy much……

********************

In the 1970s when I came to Congress as a staffer, my elected boss used to say, “If I’m going to be one of the fathers of this legislation I’d like to be in the room at the time of conception and not just at the birth…”

That’s bipartisanship: in on the ground floor, opinions heard and incorporated, and sleeves rlled up for real work.

A book on how to achieve good legislation through bipartisanship would have to feature how NOT to to go about it the Obama, Pelosi, Reid way….and then use the New York Times, an appearance on Leno, “60 Minutes,” and the Internet to get the word out…. to spin a feeling that bipartisanship was tried and the Republicans rejected the offer….

The president’s “outrach” of bipartisanship is like purchased sex with a working girl; it is sleezy and meaningless.  Maybe he needs some chachki toys or aluminum key chains with little hand painted “Air Force One” or “White House” creations to hand out to Republicans…..  Or maybe a little yellow tractor from Caterpillar on a key chain….Or Abe Lincoln to remind one of two great presidents….

Early on the president hosted a cocktail party at the White House and a Super Bowl party in the name of bipartisanship: now I think the free peanuts for Republicans are off the table….

***********

It seems to us at Peace and Freedom that the president and TheNew York Times don’t know what “bipartisansip” means.

We went to a congressional staff in the early 1970s and learned back then that bipartisanship means:

(1)   At the start of every piece of legislation, both parties meet to discuss, share ideas and formulate, at least conceptually, new law.

(2) That both parties treat the other side with dignity and respect, sharing ideas in order to get the best for the American people.

(3)  Both sides tell the truth and neither tries to seize the high ground and gloat over the other before the media.

In the case of this stimulus, President Obama talked a good game of bipartisanship but he was clueless on how to achieve it.

His Williamsburg, Va., spa speech and his evening press conference in the White House were both partisan speeches….which included ugly distortions and lies.

Nancy Pelosi shut out Republican input at the start of the process to build the stimulus bill and minutes before voting on final passage there were still complaints that the bill had been “hidden” from lawmakers and the American people intentioanlly by the Democratic side.

Mr. Obama’s personal “bipartisan outreach” consisted of:

–“I won.”

–Efforts to give “goodies” to Republicans like a Super Bowl party, rides on Air Force One and a cocktail party at the White House as if they could be bought like children at Christams.

–“Cram this down throats” at the spa in Williamsburg.

–Campaign-style events at Peoria, Fort Myers, and Elkhart…

–Photo op sessions with Republicans in the House and then the Senate.

–Not one “roll up the sleeves” and negotiate session with both parties at the White House. The pseudo president in the movie “Dave” did a better job of this that Mr. Obama…..

–A big lie at Peoria: “Yesterday, Jim [Owens], the head of Caterpillar, said that if Congress passes our plan, this company will be able to rehire some of the folks who were just laid off,” Obama said in Peoria.

But when asked if the stimulus could do that, Owens said, “I think, realistically, no. The honest reality is we’re probably going to have more layoffs before we start hiring again.”

http://michellemalkin.com/2009/0
3/26/he-asked-for-it-he-got-it/

GOP sees signs of life in Northeast

March 24, 2009

In the Republican graveyard of the Northeast, the region where the party all but ceased to compete over the past decade, there are signs of GOP life in places that as recently as November seemed to have none.

By Josh Kraushaa
Politico

In Connecticut, there is an unexpected opportunity to unseat veteran Sen. Chris Dodd (D-Conn.) in 2010. In New Jersey, incumbent Gov. Jon Corzine (D) trails his Republican challenger in the polls. Several House races seem promising in neighboring New York, where Democratic Gov. David Paterson’s bungling of a recent Senate appointment has jeopardized both his seat and the one now held by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.).

It’s not exactly a rebirth, but the combination of some self-inflicted Democratic wounds, the economic downturn and the departure of President George W. Bush has shell-shocked Northeastern Republicans cautiously optimistic about their fortunes in 2010.

“To predict there is now a groundswell of support for Republicans is a little pretentious,” said former Rep. Charlie Bass (R-N.H.), who lost a reelection bid in 2006. “But clearly the traditional voter in the Northeast is looking more closely at Republicans with Bush and the war in Iraq not on the front burner anymore. Now the Democrats have their scandals, they have their problems, and the American people are looking back and thinking we need to balance things out.”

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/po
litico/20090324/pl_politico/20394

Mark Levin Reminds Americans that Values Count

March 24, 2009

Republicans need to review the past in order to effectively move into the future.

And Republicans need to regain their core values fast in order to effectively work through the current Obama Administration’s march toward socialism.

The Republican past is not John McCain, much as he is loved and admired.

And though many of us think about Ronald Reagan, we must grasp the values and not the personalities we need now — a personality will rise in his or her own time.

Mark Levin’s book  “Liberty and Tyranny” is an effort to get us all to think again about the values we need.

Judd Gregg, who nearly became Barack Obama’s Commerce Secretary, seems to have regained his good thinking and is now speaking out about the Obama budget.

“It just seems inappropriate and irresponsible to spend so much that we send along a huge debt to our children and grandchildren,” he said today on the Fox News Channel.

Good Republican thinking.

“This is a massive spending document that increases government and taxes dramatically.”

So is that a good thing?

Republican cannot allow Rahm Emanuel, Robert Gibbs and the others to define them.  Democrats fear a united conservative movement and have worked hard to make the discussion about Limbaugh or Steele.

The discussion is not about who.  The discussion is about the values and how best to achieve them.

Related:
Republicans: If You Can’t Agree On Core Values Now, Commit Harakiri

 Republicans Must Hang Together, or One By One

Michelle:
http://michellemalkin.com/2009/03/2
4/congrats-mark-levin/

 Liberated “Almost Commerce Sec” Gregg: Obama’s Harshest Budget, Debt Critic

 U.S. Seeks Expanded Power to Seize Firms

 Because of Obama, Our enemies sense weakness

Senators Ready To Abandon Missile Defense:
http://senatus.wordpress.com/2009/03/24/lev
in-hopes-missile-defense-compromises-lead-t
o-russian-assistance-on-iran/

GOP sees signs of life in Northeast

Republicans Must Hang Together, or One By One

March 23, 2009

“We must all hang together, or most assuredly we shall all hang separately.”

Didn’t Ben Franklin say that in the dawning days of our nation?  Back then, the King of England could really use the noose.

Today, the Republicans in congress might need some reminders that they’ll still die election deaths if they keep going down the road they are on.

Last week’s vote in the House to impose a 90% tax on those getting AIG bonus money is a good example of Republicans failing to vote against a brainless but popular idea of the majority — and miss an opportunity to explain why the majority might be making bad law.

Eighty five Republicans joined the “public outrage” instead of engaging their brains and asking, “What should principled Republicans suggest?”

Hint: we are against taxes.  Especially confiscatory taxes: no matter how bad a guy we are chasing.  And we are against making laws, especially tax laws, to punish.  And we think the House should stay millions of miles from any legislation that even might be unconstitutional.

Last week there were lots of tagets beside AIG employees: Senator Dodd, among them.

You dogs chased the wrong car.  You joined ACORN in vilifying AIG employees who had signs reading “Capitalism is organized crime.”

And Republicans in the House, you added your names to a witch hunt that was border-line lawlessness.


ACORN activists at the homes of AIG executives on Saturday

Arch liberal Bush hater Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) was on the conservative Fox News Channel awhile back to say, “Our country is being looted.”

If he can get this: so can all Republicans.

This is time for Republicans to stand united or die trying.  And for some that are on the fence like Maine’s Snowe and Collins and Arlen Specter of the Keystone state: we say adieu or seppuku.

Looks like Specter will leave the GOP anyway….

Health care?  Good luck: but try to stand united. If we can’t afford it, maybe we can’t afford it.  But make your care.

Schools should be federalized and the White House is writing the legislation?  No brainer.  Money has rarely made schools better but has often enriched bad teachers and entrenched unions.

Spending at the rate of $1 billion an hour?  Unsustainable generational theft.  Even China is worried.

Energy: are you with Al Gore or against him?

Foreign policy?  Do you believe Iran, China, North Korea and the Taliban will play nice?  Sending videos will do, do you think?

Terrorism: a word Obama has removed from the lexicon, is still maybe a threat?  What say you?

What happened to drill, baby, drill?  Too hot to even discuss now?  We shall ignore all our natural resources and be the wind powered nation?  When? At what cost and when will the grid be ready?

Corruption: Republicans want an end of corruption and total truth and honesty in government.  Right?  Pass a new Dodd Law that prohibits his kind of conduct.  Better yet: pass a law punishing those that don’t even read legislative proposals and then vote for them.

Time to ressurect the Newt style contract with what’s remaining of America before it is too late guys and gals….

DO NOT allow Rahm Emanuel to define you.  You are not Rush and maybe you are not Steele.  Abortion still matters?

Time to unite.

Or hang one by one.

********************

Politico Defines Republicans

Watching the various spats among conservatives, it’s difficult to tell whether one is witnessing a series of lively political disagreements or an episode of “Monday Night Raw.” 

In one corner, there’s former Bush administration speechwriter David Frum versus talk radio king Rush Limbaugh. In another ring, Limbaugh is taking on former House speaker-turned-conservative guru Newt Gingrich. And in the Royal Rumble, Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele is battling, well, pretty much everybody in the GOP

Liberals have shown no small measure of delight in this fracas, and understandably so. Taking political advantage of conservative fratricide makes perfect sense, as it’s the strategic execution of Henry Kissinger’s observation about the Iran-Iraq War: “It’s a pity both sides can’t lose.” Fueling the intra-party fire weakens the GOP from within. Even the White House has gotten in on the act with senior figures like spokesperson Robert Gibbs and chief of staff Rahm Emanuel launching attacks on administration critics ranging from Limbaugh to CNBC personalities Rick Santelli and Jim Cramer

But as liberals engage in multiple rounds of schadenfreude over conservative wrangling, what’s noticeable is that the burgeoning civil war we’re witnessing on the right could not play out on the left, at least not rise to the level of gravity that would attract front-page articles in Newsweek or the instigation of partisans on the other side. And that’s because liberals — unlike conservatives — do not have a “movement” over which to fight. 

Given the Barack Obama phenomenon, the rise of the liberal blogosphere and overwhelming Democratic congressional majorities, the proposition that liberals lack a movement might sound strange. But while the Republican Party comprises three steadfast pillars (free marketers, defense hawks and the religious right), the Democratic Party remains a coalition of a vast and diverse assemblage of interest groups (minorities, labor unions, academics, trial lawyers, etc.) rather than an ideological enterprise. As such, the Democrats, up until very recently, have long had more intense internal squabbling than the Republicans, whose various factions learned to reconcile. 

The conservative movement began to take form in the 1950s as a reaction to the then-regnant statist consensus. It was firmly anti-communist, opposed the New Deal and the further expansion of government programs, and later launched a harsh critique on many of the social changes that took place in the 1960s and 1970s. What further distinguishes the conservative movement from the liberal coalition is that conservatives built an array of institutions to sustain their ideological apparatus. In Washington and across the country, there exists a constellation of think tanks, like the Heritage Foundation and the American Enterprise Institute. In the 1980s, conservatives took to the airwaves and now attract tens of millions of listeners every day on talk radio. Perhaps the most important feature of the movement was its recruitment of young people through organizations like Young America’s Foundation, which identifies and trains conservative students on campuses across the country. 

To see the vitality — if not reasonableness — of the movement, one only had to visit last month’s Conservative Political Action Conference, an annual ritual that attracts conservative activists, politicians and celebrities from across the country. There is no liberal equivalent of this confab. Indeed, the relative influence of the conservative movement on the GOP versus any liberal parallel on the Democratic Party can be seen in the vast number of Republican politicians who proudly call themselves “conservative.” By contrast, few Democrats publicly identify themselves as “liberal,” opting for the more vague and voguish “progressive,” if at all.

Liberals are belatedly constructing themselves a movement akin to the one crafted by their ideological adversaries. In 2003, John Podesta founded the Center for American Progress, a partisan think tank explicitly modeled on Heritage. Media Matters aggressively attacks any perceived anti-liberal media bias in the same way that conservative watchdog groups have been monitoring the mainstream press since the 1980s. POLITICO’s Ben Smith has reported on the daily conference call in which the heads of more than 20 major liberal interest groups participate to shape a coherent message for the day, as well as Unity ’09, a coalition of groups ranging from MoveOn.org to the American Civil Liberties Union “aimed at helping President Obama push his agenda through Congress.” Never before have the disparate organizations of the American left been so well-coordinated.

Does the nascent liberal movement portend good or ill? Judging that question depends in part upon whether or not one agrees with the agenda. If scaling back American commitments overseas, increasing the power of unions, and building a more left-leaning Supreme Court, among other goals, of course, are your thing, then the means by which these ends are achieved will presumably matter less than their attainment.

But the answer also lies in whether or not movement politics is itself a healthy feature of the American electoral system. There is something ironic in the tendency of liberals to denounce the staleness and conformity of the conservative movement and relish in its apparent demise while constructing something of their own that is just as ideologically rigid.

James Kirchick is an assistant editor of The New Republic.

 See Michelle Malkin:
http://michellemalkin.com/2009/03/23/a
-question-for-the-85-cya-on-aig-house-rep
ublicans/

****************

Congressional Insanity 90% Tax on Bonuses

March 19, 2009

The Associated Press said that the 90% tax passed the House….

The bill will take 90% of any bonus money paid to employees of companies, like AIG, who have accepted bailout money….

The vote was 328-93.

Said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi: “We want our money back and we want our money back now for the taxpayers.”

Republicans called it a legally questionable ploy to paper over Obama administration missteps.

http://michellemalkin.com/2009/0
3/19/putting-on-a-great-show-kab
uki-in-the-house/

http://www.frugal-cafe.com/publi
c_html/frugal-blog/frugal-cafe-bl
ogzone/2009/03/19/alice-throu
gh-the-looking-glass-tax-aig-to-ob
livion/

Punishment by tax is unconstitutional becaue that is the kind of trickery pulled to punish our Founders the colonists: by the King of England.

There could be a legal challenge to this bill: telling us again that rushed legislation is often bad legislation….Like the stimulus….

So are the Democrats sure they want to vote on a 90% tax for AIG and others like them?

Guess who loves this good thinking?  Nancy Pelosi and Charlie Rangel.

These guys are eating my lunch….

Second idea; the Democrats want to rush this to a vote in the House: the same kind of brainless conduct that brought us the stimulus and the AIG bonuses in the first place.

“Give me a f *&$%# ing break.”

Related:
Pelosi, Rangel rushing to tax AIG and other bonuses 90%; This caused a revolution once…

Associated Press says the House passed the 90% Tax:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090
319/ap_on_go_co/aig_outrage

Related:
Economic Recovery? “These guys are eating my lunch”

Lawmaking by Stampede Made the Stimulus, Now We’ll Tax ‘Bonuses’ the Simulus Allowed?
.
Obama On Geithner Sounds Like “Brownie, you’re doing a heck of a job”
.
Pelosi, Rangel rushing to tax AIG and other bonuses 90%; This caused a revolution once…

AIG Bonus Snafu: Boomeranging Into the Faces of Democrats?

“Dodd The Dodge” — Senator Weasels Away The Truth; And Not Artfully

Obama the centrist, pragmatic problem-solver is gone: now liberal spendathon, no accountability
.
News at eleven followed by Jay Leno and Barack on the National Barack Channel….

Obama, Pelosi: Anything to Win

Obama,

Expect Obama To Trash Bipartisan Pledge and Railroad His Budget Through Congress “Rubber Stamp”

March 18, 2009

Even with a huge majority of Democrats in the House and an ample edge in the Senate, Barack Obama is expected to take no chances on anything stopping his spending train.

The legislative and deliberation shortcut is called “budget reconciliation”…..

By using this trick,Obama can be assured he’ll get his hands on a lot more money than he might if he went through normal congressional procedure….

President Obama urged more speed just yesterday for his next budget: a $3.6 trillion beheamouth.  “Budget reconciliation” would allow him to get exactly what he wants.  So watch this develop: AIG is a distraction.  The AIG bonuses ate less than 0.1 % of the AIG bailout…..

That doesn’t include all the health care money Obama wants by a long shot:
Health care overhaul may cost another $1.5 trillion or more

Obama’s budget doesn’t yet fully address the climate change measures he wants: Cha-ching:
 Obama climate plan could cost $2 trillion

The stimulus — which no “lawmaker” has admitted to reading before it was passed, was a lesson in why we need congress to deliberate and not rubber stamp spending bills.

But the president naturally wants more spending, less deliberation and more rubber stamping — which will get him his goals and reelection….

By John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom

Obama’s Real Problem: He Still Wants Toxic Acid Bank Bailout $750B, Budget of $3.6 Trillion, and More

*********************

By Lori Montgomery
The Washington Post

Senior members of the Obama administration are pressing lawmakers to use a shortcut to drive the president’s signature initiatives on health care and energy through Congress without Republican votes, a move that many lawmakers say would fly in the face of President Obama’s pledge to restore bipartisanship to Washington.

Republicans are howling about the proposal to expand health coverage and tax greenhouse gas emissions without their input, warning that it could irrevocably damage relations with the new president.

“That would be the Chicago approach to governing: Strong-arm it through,” said  Sen. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.), who briefly considered joining the Obama administration as commerce secretary. “You’re talking about the exact opposite of bipartisan. You’re talking about running over the minority, putting them in cement and throwing them in the Chicago River.”

The shortcut, known as “budget reconciliation,” would allow Obama’s health and energy proposals to be rolled into a bill that cannot be filibustered, meaning Democrats could push it through the Senate with 51 votes, instead of the usual 60. Presidents Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton both used the tactic to win deficit-reduction packages, while George W. Bush used it to push through his signature tax cuts.

Administration officials say they have not made a final decision about whether to use the maneuver. But White House budget director Peter R. Orszag said yesterday that it is “premature to be taking it off the table.” Meanwhile, key administration officials, including White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, are pushing for reconciliation instructions in the budget proposal that Democrats are scheduled to unveil next week, congressional sources said.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-d
yn/content/article/2009/03/17/AR
2009031703798.html?hpid=topnews

http://michellemalkin.com/2009/03
/18/hey-how-about-spending-anot
her-2-trillion/

The conservative civil war

March 16, 2009

Beltway conservatives are turning against Rush Limbaugh. The most recent assassin is David Frum. The former Bush speechwriter and fellow at the American Enterprise Institute wrote an article, “Why Rush is wrong,” in the March 16 edition of Newsweek, attacking the popular talk radio host.

By Jeffery Kuhner
The Washington Times

Mr. Frum argues that Mr. Limbaugh should not be the “public face” of the conservative movement. Mr. Frum says Mr. Limbaugh is caught in a time warp, championing small government and tax cuts when economic realities have changed. Mr. Frum criticizes Mr. Limbaugh’s Feb. 28 speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference. Mr. Frum also excoriates Mr. Limbaugh for saying he hopes President Obama fails. This supposedly puts conservatives on the defensive, making us look mean, petty and unsympathetic to the suffering of Americans during the financial crisis.

Moreover, Mr. Frum maintains that Mr. Limbaugh’s macho, cigar-chomping, bombastic personality, combined with his angry libertarian populism is driving key segments of the electorate – women, Hispanics, independents and college graduates – away from the Republican Party. In his view, Mr. Frum wants to “enlarge” the Republican coalition while Mr. Limbaugh seeks to “narrow” it in the name of doctrinal purity.

Mr. Frum is part of a growing number of elitist conservatives seeking to revamp and redefine the political right. Others include David Brooks, Ross Douthat, Reihan Salam, Ramesh Ponnuru and Newt Gingrich.

These conservatives are amateur Machiavellians posing as sophisticated political strategists. They offer policy prescriptions that will supposedly transform the GOP into a national governing majority once again. They claim to represent the future; Mr. Limbaugh the past.

However, they are effete policy wonks who lack firm principles. During the 1990s, Mr. Frum argued that the problem with Republicans is they lacked the will to fight the liberal ruling class. They had abandoned their anti-statist, tax-cutting, socially conservative roots.

Now, he argues the very opposite: It’s time for the GOP to accommodate prevailing social liberal forces. Mr. Frum recommends that the GOP jettison income tax cuts and embrace free-market health-care reform. He suggests Republicans adopt pro-environment policies and gay rights. He also wants the party to be more receptive to pro-choice vice presidential candidates such as Tom Ridge who, if chosen as John McCain’s running mate, would have made Pennsylvania more competitive in the November election.

In other words, Mr. Frum now wants to create a progressive conservatism characterized by expanding health-care coverage, environmentalism and hostility – or at least indifference – to traditional values. This is not adapting conservative principles to current realities, but diluting them to the point that they morph into liberalism. He is not saving conservatism; he is destroying it.

Mr. Frum is consistently wrong. For example, he has led the charge in defense of uncontrolled immigration, claiming it is good for business and America. When conservatives point out that no nation can absorb such a massive influx of immigrants – both legal and illegal – without profound social and economic dislocations, Mr. Frum dismisses them as “nativists.” The very Hispanics voting for the Democrats by large majorities are the direct result of the open-borders policies advocated by the likes of Mr. Frum.

Mr. Frum has taken credit for coining the phrase “Axis of Evil.” He predicted the war in Iraq would be quick, decisive and easy. Instead, it has degenerated into a protracted, bloody experiment in nation-building.

Elitist conservatives, like Mr. Frum, are consumed by power. They are not genuine, independent public intellectuals. Rather, they serve as the communications arm of the GOP. Ideas are simply pieces on a chessboard in which to checkmate the Democratic opposition. Principles, truth, morality – they are all expendable in the grand game of politics. They are deracinated narcissists who live in a policy bubble and are detached from the values and interests of Middle America.

What Mr. Frum and his ilk don’t understand is that most voters don’t care about free-market health-care reform – or other boutique policy issues, such as hybrid cars, health savings accounts or partially privatizing Social Security. These will not revive the GOP.

Voters do care about the state of the country. What they have seen under Republican rule during the Bush years has been colossal incompetence: rampant corruption, runaway spending, soaring deficits, failing schools, broken borders, corporate plutocracy and quagmire in the Middle East.

The GOP has lost the electorate’s trust as a responsible party capable of governing. Posing as progressive Republicans will not solve the problem. In fact, it will only reinforce the electorate’s cynicism about the GOP’s lack of principles and honesty.

The Republican Party is supposed to be not only the conservative party, but the nationalist party. It has stood for great transcendental causes – abolishing slavery, preserving the constitutional republic of limited government and federalism, defeating totalitarian communism. If it abandons the seminal issues of our time – the defense of the family and the unborn – then it has lost its historical purpose. Social conservatives and pro-lifers will leave in droves. The GOP will become morally and ideologically rudderless; its various factions will fracture, reducing a once-dominant party into a rump.

Many elitist conservatives – including Mr. Frum – backed former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani to be the 2008 Republican standard-bearer, even though it threatened to rupture the GOP. He was their dream candidate: pro-choice, pro-gay rights, pro-environment, pro-immigration, pro-education reform – the ideal nominee for women, independents and educated professionals. Mr. Giuliani’s candidacy, however, crashed and burned. His failure should have served as a warning. Voters – from both parties – don’t care for progressive Republicans.

Conservatives are in a state of civil war. The ultimate target of the attacks on talk radio is a populist conservatism that fuses patriotism, free-market capitalism and social traditionalism. First, it Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin was disparaged by the elitist right. Now, it Mr. Limbaugh is the target. Mrs. Palin energized activists across the country and Mr. Limbaugh and talk radio mobilizes and gets the message out to tens of millions of listeners.

By contrast, elitist conservatives sit in their ivory towers building castles in the sky as their country burns.

Minorities Need Conservatives; and Conservatives Need Minorities

March 16, 2009

Today conservatism is stigmatized in our culture as an antiminority political philosophy. In certain quarters, conservatism is simply racism by another name. And minorities who openly identify themselves as conservatives are still novelties, fish out of water.

By Shelby Steele
The Wall Street Journal

Yet there is now the feeling that without an appeal to minorities, conservatism is at risk of marginalization. The recent election revealed a Republican Party — largely white, male and Southern — seemingly on its way to becoming a “regional” party. Still, an appeal targeted just at minorities — reeking as it surely would of identity politics — is anathema to most conservatives. Can’t it be assumed, they would argue, that support of classic principles — individual freedom and equality under the law — constitutes support of minorities? And, given the fact that blacks and Hispanics often poll more conservatively than whites on most social issues, shouldn’t there be an easy simpatico between these minorities and political conservatism?

But of course the reverse is true. There is an abiding alienation between the two — an alienation that I believe is the great new challenge for both modern conservatism and formerly oppressed minorities. Oddly, each now needs the other to evolve.