Archive for the ‘satellite’ Category

Warships from Japan, U.S. Could Shoot Down North Korean Missile

March 27, 2009

North Korea says it is prepared to launch a long range missile that will put a satelliete into orbit.

The U.S. says North Korea is really testing a long range ballistic missile that could put a nuclear weapon on the United States.

japan is stuck in the middle.  If the North Korean flight fails, Japan could be under a rain cloud of debris and rocket fuel.  If the North korean flight is successful, Japan could be the victim of a North korean missle attack.

Both the U.S. and Japan have the capability to shoot down the North korean missile, experts say, and both sides have sent ships at sea in a show that they mean business.

North Koreea upped the ante Thursday by saying if their missile is shot down they will restart their nuclear weapon progam.  Previously the North koreans said  by shooting down its peaceful satellite launch the aggressor would commit an act of war.

USS Hopper, a destroyer with the Aegis radar system aboard, was scheduled for a port call in Japan in coming days. But the port call was canceled and the ship will remain in the Sea of Japan ahead of the launch. Hooper is on the missile shoot down patrol and will be joined by at least two other U.S. Navy ships and at least two from Japan that could shoot down the North korean missile.

It’s a classic stand off of politics and military.

Peace and Freedom

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TOKYO – Japan’s military mobilized Friday to protect the country from any threat if North Korea‘s looming rocket launch fails, ordering two missile-equipped destroyers to the Sea of Japan and sending batteries of Patriot missile interceptors to protect the northern coastline.

Pyongyang plans to launch its Kwangmyongsong-2 satellite April 4-8, a moved that has stoked already heightened tensions in the region. The U.S., Japan and South Korea suspect the North will use the launch to test the delivery technology for a long-range missile capable of striking Alaska.

Japan has said that it will shoot down any dangerous objects that fall its way if the launch doesn’t go off successfully. Tokyo, however, has been careful to say that it will not intervene unless its territory is in danger.

The North said earlier this month that any attack on the satellite would be an act of war.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090
327/ap_on_re_as/as_japan_nkorea_missile

CNN:
http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD
/asiapcf/03/27/north.korea.us.ships/index.html

The USS Chaffee is one of two destroyers headed to South Korea for an upcoming ceremony.

The USS Chaffee is one of at least two U.S. Navy destroyers headed to patrol.

China boosts military, cyberwarfare capabilities

March 26, 2009

A CNN news story on a Pentagon assessment of China’s military says, “China’s military is developing longer-range ballistic and anti-ship missiles that are “shifting the balance of power in the region” and could help Beijing secure resources or settle territorial disputes, a report released by the Pentagon said Wednesday.”

U.S. and Chinese militaries need "resumption of dialogue,"  Adm. Timothy Keating told Congress. 

U.S. and Chinese militaries need “resumption of dialogue,” Adm. Timothy Keating told Congress.

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China is continuing a large-scale military buildup of high-tech forces that includes “disruptive” anti-satellite missiles, new strategic forces, and computer attack weapons, the Pentagon’s annual report to Congress on the Chinese military says.

“China has made steady progress in recent years in developing offensive nuclear, space, and cyber warfare capabilities — the only aspects of China’s armed forces that, today, have the potential to be truly global,” says the report entitled “Military Power of the People’s Republic of China (PRC)” that was released Wednesday.

By Bill Gertz
The Washington Times

While noting that China has limited ability to sustain power far from its shores, the report warns that Beijing’s communist controlled armed forces “continue to develop and field disruptive military technologies, including those for anti-access/area-denial, as well as for nuclear, space, and cyber warfare, that are changing regional military balances and that have implications beyond the Asia-Pacific region.”

Anti-access and area denial weapons include precision-guided ballistic and cruise missiles and submarines that are designed to attack aircraft carriers, the report said. The report also criticized China’s arms sales to countries like Iran, Sudan and Zimbabwe. It noted that Chinese arms supplied to Iran were found to have been transferred to terrorist organizations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

This is a serious issue that the United States continues to monitor, the report said.

Under a section on significant developments over the past year, this year’s report for the first time described China’s efforts to develop and wage computer warfare by attacking networks and electronic infrastructure.

In 2008, numerous computer systems around the world, including those owned by the U.S. Government, continued to be the target of intrusions that appear to have originated within the PRC, the report said.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2
009/mar/26/pentagon-beijing-boostin
g-cyberwarfare/

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China Objects To U.S. View

AP

China is criticizing a newly released U.S. report on Beijing’s growing military power as interference in its internal affairs, and says it could damage military relations between the two nations.

Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang said Wednesday at a regularly scheduled press conference that “China resolutely opposes it and has made solemn representation to the U.S. side.”

A U.S. Defense Department report released in Washington, D.C. said that Beijing continues to develop weapons that threaten longtime rival Taiwan, even though tensions between the two sides have been reduced significantly.

The report also said that China is developing longer range capabilities that could have an effect beyond the Asia-Pacific region.

See also CNN:
http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiap
cf/03/25/china.military.report/index.html

North Korea Warns: Shoot Down Our Satellite Will “Prompt Counterstrikes by the Most Powerful Military Means”

March 9, 2009

North Korea warned Monday that any move to intercept what it calls a satellite launch and what other countries suspect may be a missile test-firing would result in a counterstrike against the countries trying to stop it.

By AP and Kyodo

“We will retaliate (over) any act of intercepting our satellite for peaceful purposes with prompt counterstrikes by the most powerful military means,” the official Korean Central News Agency quoted a spokesman of the General Staff of the Korean People’s Army as saying.

If countries such as the United States, Japan or South Korea try to intercept the launch, the North Korean military will carry out “a just retaliatory strike operation not only against all the interceptor means involved but against the strongholds” of the countries, it said.

“Shooting our satellite for peaceful purposes will precisely mean a war,” it added.

North Korea earlier announced it is preparing to put a communications satellite into space, but outside observers suspect it may in fact be a test-firing of a long-range ballistic missile.

The United States, Japan and South Korea have said that even if Pyongyang calls the launch a missile test, it would violate existing U.N. Security Council resolutions.

The same North Korean statement said the country’s military will cut off communications with its South Korean counterparts during the U.S.- South Korean exercises for the duration of the exercises beginning Monday.

A separate, more rare statement by the KPA’s Supreme Command was quoted by the KCNA as saying that its soldiers are under orders to be “fully combat-ready” during U.S.-South Korean military exercises beginning Monday.

The North’s armed forces have been ordered to “deal merciless retaliatory blows” should there be any intrusion “into the sky and land and seas of the DPRK even an inch.”

DPRK stands for Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, North Korea’s official name.

North Korea has demanded a stop to this month’s U.S.-South Korean exercises, and said earlier it cannot guarantee the security of South Korean civilian airplanes flying through its territorial airspace while they are under way.


A U.S. Navy ship launches ballistic missile defense interceptors like those that could be used to counter North Korea’s long range missile launch….

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North Korea Again Issues War Warning

By JAE-SOON CHANG, Associated Press Writer

North Korea put its armed forces on standby for war Monday and threatened retaliation against anyone seeking to stop the regime from launching a satellite into space in the latest barrage of threats from the communist regime.

Pyongyang also cut off a military hot line with the South, causing a complete shutdown of their border and stranding hundreds of South Koreans staying at an industrial zone in the North Korean border city of Kaesong.

The warning came as U.S. and South Korean troops kicked off their annual war games across the South, exercises the North has condemned as preparation for an invasion. Pyongyang last week threatened South Korean passenger planes flying near its airspace during the drills.

Analysts say the regime is trying to grab President Barack Obama‘s attention as his administration formulates its North Korea policy.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090
309/ap_on_re_as/as_koreas_tension

Russia building anti-satellite weapons

March 5, 2009

Russia is working to develop anti-satellite weapons to match efforts by other nations, a deputy defense minister was quoted as saying Thursday.

Gen. Valentin Popovkin said Russia continues to oppose a space arms race but will respond to moves made by other countries, according to Russian news reports.

“We can’t sit back and quietly watch others doing that, such work is being conducted in Russia,” Popovkin was quoted as saying.

Russia already has some “basic, key elements” of such weapons, but refused to elaborate, Popovkin said.

Popovkin, who previously was the chief of Russian military Space Forces, reportedly made the statement at a news conference in response to a question about U.S. and Chinese tests of anti-satellite weapons.

In February 2008, a U.S. Navy ship launched a missile that hit a dying spy satellite. The test boosted the credibility of missile defense advocates. In 2007, China destroyed one of its own defunct satellites with a ballistic missile.

The Kremlin has criticized U.S. plans for space-based weapons, saying they could trigger a new arms race. Russia and China have pushed for an international agreement banning space weapons, but their proposals have been rejected by the United States.

As part of missile defense plans developed by the previous U.S. administration, the Pentagon worked on missiles, ground lasers and other technology to shoot down satellites.

George W. Bush’s administration plan to locate missile defense sites in Poland and the Czech Republic put it at odds with Russia, which opposed the move as a threat to its security.

President Barack Obama has signaled that he might forgo an anti-missile system in Eastern Europe if Russia helps end a standoff over Iran‘s nuclear ambitions.

–Associated Press

Iran launches first satellite

February 3, 2009

Iran’s missile, technology space and weapons effort has been going since the late 1980s.  We know they have a nuclear program, and long range ballistic missile capability.  This is their first sucessful satellite launch.  North Korea has nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles much like that seen in Iran, but North Korea has failed in its satellite launch attempts….

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Iran has launched its first domestically built satellite into space.

The launch of the Omid satellite, meaning Hope, was timed to coincide with the 30th anniversary of the Islamic revolution and United Nations talks aimed at stopping Iran’s nuclear programme.

The Telegraph (UK)

The Safir (ambassador) satellite-carrier rocket, carrying Iran's ... 
The Safir (ambassador) satellite-carrier rocket, carrying Iran’s Omid 2 (hope) satellite, is launched at an unknown location in Iran in this handout picture sent to Reuters by Iranian Fars News February 3, 2009. Iran said it launched its first domestically made satellite into orbit on Tuesday, boasting major progress in its space technology when tension with the West over its nuclear ambitions persists. Omid, launched as Iran marks the 30th anniversary this month of the 1979 Islamic revolution that ousted the U.S.-backed shah, is designed for research and telecommunications, state television said.(Fars News/Reuters)

“Dear Iranians, your children have put the first indigenous satellite into orbit,” said President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in a broadcast on state television.

“With this launch the Islamic Republic of Iran has officially achieved a presence in space.”

The launch has highlighted international concerns that Iran will use domestically developed space technology to develop intercontinental nuclear missiles.

Tehran is at odds with the international community and the UN over a controversial nuclear programme which Iran has insisted is only for peaceful energy purposes.

The United States and European Union suspect that Iran is secretly developing atomic weapons and harbours ambitions to use its home grown Safir space rocket technology to build long-range ballistic missiles capable of carrying nuclear warheads.

Omid’s take off comes just a one day before senior diplomats from the UN Security Council meet in Germany to discuss Iran’s refusal to stop uranium enrichment as part of its nuclear programme.

Manouchehr Mottaki, Iran’s foreign minister, used the occasion of the satellite launch to criticise Western and UN anti-atomic weapons proliferation embargoes on nuclear and space technology.

Reported satellite launch took place on the 30th anniversary of the Islamic revolution in Iran.

Reported satellite launch took place on the 30th anniversary of the Islamic revolution in Iran.

“The difference between our country and some countries which have these capacities is that we believe science belongs to all humanity,” he said.

“Some people believe that advanced technologies belong to some countries exclusively.”

Mr Mottaki added: “In Iran’s history, in the last 100 years, you cannot point to aggression by Iran against any nation. Iran’s people are peace-loving they want peace with all countries around the world.”

See a video:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews
/middleeast/iran/4445416/Iran-launches-fir
st-satellite.html

Related:
Satellite and space weapon dilemma

 Obama seeks space weapons ban

U.S. In Major New Space Race; Like It Or Not
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North Korea to ‘Test Missile Capable of Striking U.S.’

A U.S. defense official told CNN’s Barbara Starr that the Pentagon detected an Iranian ballistic missile launch on Monday which was apparently delivering a satellite into orbit.

From CNN:
http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/me
ast/02/03/iran.satellite/index.html

Satellite and space weapon dilemma

January 30, 2009

The column I began writing at 7 a.m. on Sept. 11, 2001, addressed the American military’s reliance on satellites and issues involving “a potential arms race in space.” Of course, by 9 a.m., space militarization became less pressing, as al Qaeda turned jumbo jets into ballistic missiles and murdered 3,000 innocents.

By Ausin Bay
The Washington Times

When China tested an anti-satellite (ASAT) weapon in January 2007, I considered resurrecting the column, but America‘s “surge” in Iraq shoved outer space aside.

The Obama administration has revived the subject – after a fashion. Check the White House Web site on the page detailing defense-related campaign promises. The new administration opposes “weaponizing space” and will “restore American leadership on space issues. …” Restoration means seeking “a worldwide ban on weapons that interfere with military and commercial satellites” and includes “thoroughly” assessing “possible threats to U.S. space assets and the best options, military and diplomatic, for countering them. …” President Obama promises to accelerate “programs to harden U.S. satellites against attack.”

Though the fervent language implicitly suggests this is a dramatic change from the Bush administration, it actually echoes Maj. Gen. James Armor’s congressional testimony of May 2007 during hearings investigating the implications of China’s anti-satellite test. The hearings were the unclassified component of a thorough assessment of a real threat to U.S. space assets, the Chinese ASAT, and a public example of U.S. leadership on space issues.

Gen. Armor (director of the Pentagon’s National Security Space Office) noted that changes in U.S. space policy since the Eisenhower administration “have been evolutionary” (i.e., have changed, based on experience), but “the key tenets have remained remarkably consistent. One such tenet is the compelling need for a strong national security space sector and the inherent right of self-defense to protect U.S. national interests in space.” Yet U.S. space policy, Gen. Armor argued, is “based on a longstanding U.S. commitment to peaceful uses of outer space. …”

Advertising execs know touting laundry soap as “new” or “improved” increases sales, though the “new” product differs little from the old. From Dwight Eisenhower to George W. Bush, administrations have had to balance the “peaceful use” of space against evolving technological threats to its peaceful use. The same dilemma confronts Mr. Obama and will vex his successor, as well.

Read the rest:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/ne
ws/2009/jan/30/satellite-and-sp
ace-weapon-wiggle/

Obama Plans Moves to Counter China in Space

January 2, 2009

President-elect Barack Obama will probably tear down long-standing barriers between the U.S.’s civilian and military space programs to speed up a mission to the moon amid the prospect of a new space race with China.

Obama’s transition team is considering a collaboration between the Defense Department and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration because military rockets may be cheaper and ready sooner than the space agency’s planned launch vehicle, which isn’t slated to fly until 2015, according to people who’ve discussed the idea with the Obama team.

The potential change comes as Pentagon concerns are rising over China’s space ambitions because of what is perceived as an eventual threat to U.S. defense satellites, the lofty battlefield eyes of the military.

The launch of Change 1, Xichang Satellite Center, China.jpg
Above: A China space launch

“The Obama administration will have all those issues on the table,” said Neal Lane, who served as President Bill Clinton’s science adviser and wrote recently that Obama must make early decisions critical to retaining U.S. space dominance. “The foreign affairs and national security implications have to be considered.”

China, which destroyed one of its aging satellites in a surprise missile test in 2007, is making strides in its spaceflight program. The military-run effort carried out a first spacewalk in September and aims to land a robotic rover on the moon in 2012, with a human mission several years later.

Read the rest from Bloomberg:
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/new
s?pid=20601087&sid=aOvrNO0OJ41g
&refer=worldwide