Archive for the ‘Tibetan’ Category

Most American Media Ignore Reasons Behind China-YouTube Debacle — BBC Has Stones

March 25, 2009

China pulled the plug on YouTube: cutting off 300 million Chinese viewers.

The issue is one of free speech and international access.

But it is also about censorship and control.  A video of Chinese police beating a Tibetan protester to death is at the heart of China’s new action.

Most U.S. media have only reported that China pulled the YouTube plug.  Nothing more.

That is a crime on top of a crime — so as not to rile China we suspect.

This allows China to restrict freedom of speech and to violate norms of human rights everywhere else….

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BBC

China’s move to block YouTube has been criticised by a leading advocacy group that promotes constitutional liberties in the digital age.

The Centre for Democracy and Technology told the BBC: “China’s actions fail to live up to international norms.”

The video sharing site has been off limits in China since Monday.

“China’s apparent blocking of YouTube is at odds with the rule of law and the right to freedom of expression,” said CDT president Leslie Harris.

“Anytime a country limits or takes down content online , it must be forthright and specific about its actions and do so only in narrowly defined circumstances consistent with international human rights and the rule of law,” stated Ms Harris.

Google, which owns YouTube, told the BBC that it had no idea why the Chinese government had taken this action.

“We don’t know the reason for the block and are working to restore access to users in China as quickly as possible,” said spokesperson Scott Rubin.

Tibet

Earlier in the week, the BBC reported from Beijing that China cut off access to the website because it carried a video showing soldiers beating monks and other Tibetans.

The graphic video was released by Tibetan exiles and showed hundreds of uniformed Chinese troops swarming through a Tibetan monastery. It included footage of a group of troops beating a man with batons.

Read the rest:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/te
chnology/7962718.stm

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Chinese PM Accosted by Protesters Over Tibet in London

February 1, 2009

China’s Prime Minister Wen Jiabao came face-to-face with Free Tibet protesters in London today, an incident bound to embarrass both China and the British government. 

Protesters carrying Tibetan flags chanted “China Murderers,” and “China Out of Tibet,” as Wen, on a three day trip to Britain, arrived at the embassy.

Human rights activists have been angry at Britain’s Prime Minister Gordon Brown and China since before last summer’s Olympics.  Brown is under fore for not pressing China on the issue of Tibet.

China is seen by some as a violator of human rights in Tibet.

“Gordon Brown and other leaders failed to press the Chinese authorities to respect human rights ahead of the Olympics,” said Kate Allen, director of Amnesty International UK.
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“The result was a Games that took place against a backdrop of repression. He must not miss this opportunity to speak up for the rights of people in China.”

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Five protesters were arrested after trying to approach Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao during a Free Tibet group demonstration.

Several people vaulted barriers as he arrived outside the Chinese Embassy in London amid a noisy demonstration.

BBC

Supporters had greeted Mr Wen with dragon dancers and firecrackers as he visited as part of his UK tour.

Police arrest a pro-Tibet protester outside the Chinese embassy, ... 
Police arrest a pro-Tibet protester outside the Chinese embassy, during a visit by Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao, in central London February 1, 2009. The Chinese Premier arrived in London on Saturday in the latest leg of a European tour aimed at tackling the global financial and economic crisis and improving relations between the trading partners.REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN)

The Chinese Prime Minister had earlier met Tory leader David Cameron and shadow foreign secretary William Hague.

The focus of the meeting had been on the global financial downturn, with the UK and China both keen to boost their economic ties.

Read the rest:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/7
863613.stm

Related from CNN:
http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/europe/
02/01/china.britain.protests/index.html

A pro-Tibet protester runs past a police cordon outside the Chinese Embassy in London.

A pro-Tibet protester runs past a police cordon outside the Chinese Embassy in London.

 
China’s Prime Minister Wen Jiabao passed our compensation money to earthquake survivors last week to start the Lunar New Year.  This photo was taken last year when he visited earthquake survivors.

China’s Tibet action sparks plea

January 29, 2009

The Tibetan government-in-exile has appealed to the international community to intervene in a Chinese security crackdown in Tibet’s capital.

Eighty-one people have been detained and nearly 6,000 questioned in the past 11 days, Chinese state media reported.

BBC

The Tibetan Daily said the campaign in Lhasa was targeting criminals.

But the leaders-in-exile say they are concerned that China’s “hardline policies” may lead to a repeat of last year’s deadly anti-Chinese riots.

The centre of Lhasa has been under heavy security since last March, after peaceful protests turned violent following a military crackdown.

China said at least 18 people were killed during the unrest. Independent rights groups say about 200 people were killed and at least 1,000 are still missing.

Read the rest:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7857896.stm

Chinese paramilitary policemen patrol past the Potala Palace ... 
Chinese paramilitary policemen march past the Potala Palace in Lhasa. China has launched a clampdown in the Tibetan capital, investigating thousands of people and detaining dozens, ahead of the anniversary of the 1959 Tibetan uprising, a rights group has said.(AFP/File/Teh Eng Koon)

China to mark defeat of Tibetan rebellion

January 19, 2009

Tibet‘s Communist Party-controlled legislature has voted to create a holiday to mark China‘s defeat of a pro-independence uprising 50 years ago in the Himalayan region, calling it a day of liberation from feudalism, state media reported Monday.

By TINI TRAN, Associated Press Writer

The 382 legislators attending the session unanimously voted to designate March 28 as “Serf Liberation Day,” the official Xinhua News Agency said, citing Legqog, director of the Standing Committee of the Tibetan Autonomous Regional People’s Congress. Like many Tibetans, Legqog uses a single name.

The politically sensitive date marks the flight of Tibet’s spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, into exile in India as Chinese troops attacked in March 1959. On March 28 of that year, Beijing announced the dissolution of the Tibetan government and the establishment of the Tibet Autonomous Region under Communist rule.

China says Tibet has always been part of its territory, while many Tibetans say their land was virtually independent for centuries.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090119/ap_
on_re_as/as_china_tibet_1

Exiled Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama speaks to the press ... 
Exiled Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama speaks to the press at the EU Parliament in Brussels. China lacks the moral authority, including over the question of Tibet, to be a true superpower, the Dalai Lama said in December 2008 during a European tour that has angered Beijing.(AFP/John Thys)

China defends censoring websites that break rules

December 16, 2008

China defended Tuesday the blocking of websites it said violated Chinese law and urged Internet companies to respect its legal system.

“The Chinese government conducts necessary management over the Internet. It is the same with other nations,” foreign ministry spokesman Liu Jianchao told journalists.

art.hacker1.cnn.jpg 
Chinese journalists, Reporters Without Borders and Tibetan human rights groups all say China censors the internet too much…

“You cannot deny, some websites actually contain content that violates China’s laws.”

Liu cited websites that maintain that Taiwan is an independent nation separate from China, a view that violates China’s anti-secession law, he said.

“I hope that websites can practise self-restraint and not do things that violate China’s law,” he said.
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AFP

Liu was responding to questions on why websites belonging to the BBC, the Voice of America and Reporters Without Borders appeared to be blocked in China after they were made accessible during the Beijing Olympics.

Liu did not answer those questions, nor would he comment on the legal process leading up to the blocking of any particular website.

China exercises strict control over the Internet, blocking sites linked to Chinese dissidents, the outlawed Falun Gong spiritual movement, the Tibetan government-in-exile and those with information on the 1989 Tiananmen massacre.

Its system of Internet censorship has become known as the “Great Firewall of China” due to the large number of websites that are inaccessible from inside the country.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081216/tc_afp/chin
amediainternetcensorship_081216171844