Archive for the ‘toys’ Category

China-Made Toys Banned in India

January 23, 2009

India on Friday banned imports of several types of toys from China for six months without saying why, a move that pleased local manufacturers but shocked importers, Reuters reported.

Related:
Economy, Reputation Causing China’s Toymakers To Take a Beating

A government statement issued late on Friday did not give details but industry officials said the order would ban imports of almost all toys from China.

China and India have a long history of animosity and there could be many good reasons for excluding China made toys from the Indian market.  China has produced millions of toys in recent years that contained lead-based paint which can be poisonous to children.

China also just completd a trial in the case of hundreds of thousands of Chinese children sickened by poisoned milk.

But in the current global economic downturn, china’s toy industry has been hard hit: causing massive unemployment within China.

Related:
http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticleN
ew.asp?col=&section=business&xfile=data/
business/2009/January/business_January733.xml

CNN:
http://edition.cnn.com/2009/BUSINESS/
01/23/china.india.toys/index.html

Related:
 China Killed Children With Poisoned Milk, Held “Show Trial,” Absolved Government Regulators
.
Death, Life in Prison Sentences in China Poisoned Milk Trial

Keeping the spirit alive 
Jobless Chinese toymakers turned vendors.  Photo by  Barbara Demick, The Los Angeles Times

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Economy, Reputation Causing China’s Toymakers To Take a Beating

January 18, 2009

“Too much lead in Chinese toys.”  Thats what Mary Orr said when we asked her why she wasn’t buying Chinese toys this year for her son Matt’s birthday.  But mostly, Moms and Dads have less money this year and that means fewer toys…

In the U.S. it is too little money so less happiness.  In China it is too little money so no jobs and perhaps migrating away from the industrial areas and back to “home.”  Chinese authorities fear social unrest….

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China’s toy exports have taken a beating from the global financial crisis, with demand shrinking in the key US and European markets, state media reported Sunday.

In the period from January to November of last year, China’s shipments of toys abroad totalled eight billion dollars, an increase of just 2.5 percent from the same period a year earlier, the People’s Daily said on its website.

This compares with the first 11 months of 2007, when toy exports had increased by a blistering 20.3 percent, the paper said, citing customs authorities.

In November alone, toy exports declined 8.6 percent from the same month a year earlier, according to the paper.

A worker in a toy factory in Shenzhen. China's toy exports ... 
A worker in a toy factory in Shenzhen. China’s toy exports have taken a beating from the global financial crisis, with demand shrinking in the key US and European markets(AFP/File/Wang Lei)

Registered toy exporters plunged by nearly half last year to 4,211, the paper said, reflecting how weakening overseas demand is wreaking havoc on China‘s domestic economy.

The paper quoted customs officials as saying that apart from the global slowdown, toy exports had also been impacted by a series of recent product quality scandals.

For example, in mid-2007, US importers of Chinese toys issued recalls after some were found to be coated with toxic lead paint. Similar products were later banned in several countries.

The paper said that the United States and the European Union account for two thirds of China’s toy exports.

People’s Daily and AFP

Keeping the spirit alive 
Jobless Chinese toymakers turned vendors.  Photo by  Barbara Demick, The Los Angeles Times

Related:
China’s jobless migrants go home early for holiday

Economic Slowdown Already Sees 600,000 Chinese Migrants Relocate

China seen facing wave of unrest in 2009

China’s Toymakers: No Joy This Holiday

A migrant worker nears the train station in Guangzhou, southern ... 
A migrant worker nears the train station in Guangzhou, southern China’s Guangdong province, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2009. Some 188 million Chinese are expected to squeeze onto China’s train network in the coming weeks to return home for the Chinese Lunar New Year.(AP Photo/William Foreman)

“Last year, I went back home five or six days before the holiday started. This year, I’m going back about 20 days earlier,” said migrant Huang Mingren as he waited for his train.

For Huang and many others, the trip begins at the crowded station in Guangzhou, the capital of Guangdong province, often called the world’s factory floor because it’s China’s key manufacturing base. This is where a huge number of China’s 160 million migrant workers churn out Nike shoes, iPods and Nokia mobile phones.

China’s Toymakers: No Joy This Holiday

December 25, 2008

Claims of lead-based paint and a disaster in world-wide economic conditions has slammed Santa’s Toyland: China.

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In Dongguan, where many of Santa’s gifts are really made, nearly half of the 3,800 toy factories have closed or plan to. That’s left a vast number of workers, mostly migrants, without jobs.
By Barbara Demick
The Los Angeles Times
December 25, 2008
Reporting from Dongguan, China — Growing up in the Chinese countryside with only an elementary school education, Yang Yanjun had never heard of Christmas until she landed a job painting pink-cheeked cherubs to decorate trees.

But Christmas proved to be a miraculous holiday that would utterly transform her life. Over a decade, she worked in factories producing ornaments and toys that foreign children were told came from Santa’s workshops. She earned up to $200 a month, unimaginable riches that allowed her to build a house for her family back home.

Keeping the spirit alive 
Jobless Chinese toymakers turned vendors.  Photo by  Barbara Demick, The Los Angeles Times
.
Related:
China Faces Social Unrest As Up To 150 Million Migrants Go Home Without Work

China’s Slowing Growth, Unemployment Leads Toward Social Unrest

Read the rest:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/
world/la-fg-china-toys25-2008dec25,0,4105911.story