Archive for the ‘treatment’ Category

Methamphetamine use costs U.S. $23 billion a year

February 4, 2009

Methamphetamine use costs the United States about $23.4 billion a year considering lost lives and productivity, drug treatment, law enforcement expenses and other factors, according to a report released on Wednesday.

Methamphetamine, also called meth, is a highly addictive stimulant that users inject, snort, smoke or swallow. A form called crystal meth looks like fragments of glass and is smoked using a glass pipe like those used to smoke crack cocaine.

By Will Dunham, Reuters

The report by the nonprofit RAND Corporation found that costs relating to the 900 people who died from using meth in 2005 and the addiction of many thousands of others accounted for two-thirds of the total economic burden.

“Our study represents the most comprehensive assessment so far of the economic costs of meth use in the United States. It shows the impact of methamphetamine is substantial,” RAND economist Nancy Nicosia said in a telephone interview.

Arresting, prosecuting and incarcerating methamphetamine users plus the economic cost of various crimes they commit amounted to $4.2 billion in 2005, according to the report.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/2009020
4/hl_nm/us_methamphetamine_usa

Change: Obama Promised More Health Care Funding; But We Need Less

January 12, 2009

Will Obama be so bold? In the campaign, he proposed more, not less, health spending. It’s easier to embrace the rhetoric of change than change itself.

By Robert J.  Samuelson
The Washington Post

Barack Obama talked somberly last week about getting the federal budget under control once the present economic crisis has passed. To do that, he’ll have to confront the rapid growth of health spending, which in 2007 was already a quarter of total federal spending of $2.7 trillion. If Obama is serious, he should read a fascinating study from the McKinsey Global Institute, the research arm of the famed consulting company.

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http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/conten
t/article/2009/01/11/AR2009011101895.htm
l?hpid=opinionsbox1

Drink and Drug Too Much? Treatment Rarely A “Cure”

December 22, 2008

Every year, state and federal governments spend more than $15 billion, and insurers $5 billion more, on substance-abuse treatment services for some four million people. That amount may soon increase sharply: last year, Congress passed the mental health parity law, which for the first time includes addiction treatment under a federal law requiring that insurers cover mental and physical ailments at equal levels.

By Benedict Carey
The New York Times

Many clinics across the county have waiting lists, and researchers estimate that some 20 million Americans who could benefit from treatment do not get it.

Yet very few rehabilitation programs have the evidence to show that they are effective. The resort-and-spa private clinics generally do not allow outside researchers to verify their published success rates. The publicly supported programs spend their scarce resources on patient care, not costly studies.

And the field has no standard guidelines. Each program has its own philosophy; so, for that matter, do individual counselors. No one knows which approach is best for which patient, because these programs rarely if ever track clients closely after they graduate. Even Alcoholics Anonymous, the best known of all the substance-abuse programs, does not publish data on its participants’ success rate.

“What we have in this country is a washing-machine model of addiction treatment,” said A. Thomas McClellan, chief executive of the nonprofit Treatment Research Institute, based in Philadelphia. “You go to Shady Acres for 30 days, or to some clinic for 60 visits or 60 doses, whatever it is. And then you’re discharged and everyone’s crying and hugging and feeling proud — and you’re supposed to be cured.”

He added: “It doesn’t really matter if you’re a movie star going to some resort by the sea or a homeless person: The system doesn’t work well for what for many people is a chronic, recurring problem.”


Hollywood veteran of “the system”:
Gary Busey

Related:
France abuzz over alcoholic ‘cure’

Heath Ledger’s Legacy: Thinking About Mixing Drugs Like a Movie Star During Holidays?

Read it all:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/23/
health/23reha.html?_r=1&hp

Public security forces undermine China’s HIV fight: rights group

December 9, 2008

The harassment and imprisonment of drug users in China is undermining the country’s response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic, activist group Human Rights Watch said on Tuesday.

Police and public security forces are driving drug addicts away from community-based prevention services and denying them access to treatment, the group said in a report.

“The government has expanded prevention and treatment programmes for drug users,” said Joe Amon, HIV/AIDS programme director at Human Rights Watch.

“But at the same time, the police are detaining drug users trying to access these services, and putting drug users in so-called ‘drug rehabilitation centres’ where they are provided no drug dependency treatment and no HIV prevention or treatment services.”

A man flies a "red ribbon" kite by the Birds Nest ...
A man flies a “red ribbon” kite by the Birds Nest stadium in Beijing. The harassment and imprisonment of drug users in China is undermining the country’s response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic, activist group Human Rights Watch said(AFP/File/Gou Yige) 

AFP

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081209/hl_af
p/chinahealthaidsdrugsrights_081209074921