Archive for the ‘Troubled Asset Relief Program’ Category

“Bailout Fatigue”: Automakers’ Treatment May Extend To Other Industries

December 15, 2008

In punting on a $14 billion rescue plan for the US auto industry, the US Senate has signaled that the struggle over who gets federal help – and who is left to take their lumps in the marketplace – is likely to be an acute and ongoing issue for lawmakers into the next Congress.

The auto bailout now falls to the Bush administration, at least for the moment. The White House said Friday it may tap part of the $700 billion meant to buttress the shaky financial-services sector for the purpose of saving any of Detroit’s Big Three from collapse. At time of writing, the administration was deciding what mechanism to use to help the industry.

By Gail Russell Chaddock
Christian Science Monitor

General Motors workers file out of the General Motors Assembly ... 
General Motors workers file out of the General Motors Assembly Plant in Arlington, Texas, during shift change Friday, Dec. 12, 2008. Festering animosity between the United Auto Workers and southern Senators who torpedoed the auto industry bailout bill erupted into full-fledged name calling Friday as union officials accused the lawmakers of trying to break the union on behalf of foreign automakers.(AP Photo/Tom Pennington)

Regardless, this month’s fight in the lame-duck Congress over the auto bailout is a cautionary tale for how lawmakers are likely to deal with future calls for help. Lesson No. 1 is that swift congressional action based on the premise that an industry is too big to fail – or that job losses in the absence of a government bailout would be cataclysmic for the economy – cannot be counted on.

It’s an argument that worked for the financial-services industry, which in early October extracted from Congress as much as $700 billion in government funds to save it from ruin tied to mortgage-related debt. But the way the Treasury Department has allocated the first $350 billion in the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) has led to buyers’ remorse among many lawmakers – and appears to be making them more reticent to dole out dollars to ailing industries.

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http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/2008
1215/ts_csm/awhyone

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GM Should Live; Bush Plans Bailout from TARP

December 13, 2008

Dec. 13 (Bloomberg) — General Motors Corp. moved closer to a possible government rescue as the Bush administration said it may tap a bank bailout fund for financing and GM’s top executive discussed terms with administration officials.

GM Chief Executive Officer Rick Wagoner spoke by telephone with White House Chief of Staff Joshua Bolten and Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson about a short-term plan to keep the automaker solvent, a person familiar with the talks said.

The General Motors logo is seen outside the GM headquarters ... 
The General Motors logo is seen outside the GM headquarters in downtown Detroit, Friday, Dec. 12, 2008. GM announced it will temporarily close 20 factories across North America and make sweeping cuts to its vehicle production as it tries to adjust to dramatically weaker automobile demand.(AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

The talks followed a statement by the White House that it would consider using the Troubled Asset Relief Program to help GM and Chrysler LLC following the Senate’s rejection of an aid package the night before.

“Congress has really punted the ball over to the White House,” John Bogle, founder of the $80.6 billion Vanguard 500 Index Fund, said in a Bloomberg Television interview. “That will give them temporary stopgap aid. I do not think General Motors is going to go out of business.”

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http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?
pid=20601068&sid=aixBaUTzr7UU