Archive for the ‘Vietnamese’ Category

Jane Fonda Still Fighting Vietnam War

February 15, 2009

AN old skeleton has emerged from Jane Fonda’s closet to remind us of her traitorous embrace of the North Vietnamese, which got her dubbed “Hanoi Jane.” Docudrama Films is re leasing on DVD a long-suppressed documentary called “FTA,” a k a “[Bleep] the Army,” which chroni cles the anti-war shows Fonda staged in front of GIs. The flick opened in theaters in 1972 the same week she flew to Hanoi and encouraged the Vietnamese com munists to fight “American impe rialists.” It was yanked days later and withdrawn from circulation, and the late director Francine Par ker blamed pressure from the Nixon White House.

–New York Post


Jane Fonda in Hanoi

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Thailand denies abusing migrants; sends some to trial

January 28, 2009

It should come as no surprise that the Thai government denied that it was abusing migrants.

I live with “boat people” who fled communism in Vietnam after 1975.  Many still weep when recalling their treatment in thailand.

So I have a tendency to believe the United Nations High Commission on Refugees (UNHCR) and journalists on the scene who have spoken to the Myanmar minority Rohingya refugees now in Thailand….

Reviews of United Nations records and media reports show a pattern of questionable if not barbaric treatment of refugees in Thailand.  Currently, there are at least two regugee abuse situation inside Thailand and not just one….

Related:
Myanmar, Thailand Force Hungry Refugees to Run, Or Deport Them To Where?.

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A group of refugees who survived being at sea for a month, then being beaten and burned, now await the next turn of their fates in the Thai court system.

They’ll go to trial?
http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asia
pcf/01/28/thailand.refugees/index.html

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AFP

Thailand‘s government has “categorically denied” mistreating migrants following reports it towed hundreds of desperate boat people back out to sea and abandoned them.

Survivors say Thailand’s military towed hundreds of migrants from Myanmar’s minority Rohingya community out to sea in poorly equipped boats with scant food and water.

But the foreign ministry said such actions had no place in Thai policy.

Male refugees show scars they say were caused by beatings at the hands of the Myanmar navy.

Male refugees show scars they say were caused by beatings at the hands of the Myanmar navy.

“As for the serious allegations… including that various forms of mistreatment were inflicted… this must be categorically denied as having no place in policy and procedures,” the ministry said in a statement released late Tuesday.

“Nevertheless, should concrete evidence be presented, the Thai government would serious look into such cases and further verification (would be) carried out,” it added.

The statement said Thai law required that all migrants arriving along the south west Andaman coastline be stopped, questioned and their needs assessed.

It said those who had not smuggled goods into the kingdom received basic humanitarian assistance before being repatriated or escorted out of Thai territory. Smugglers would be investigated and then ordered out, it said.

Accusations of mistreatment surfaced earlier this month after nearly 650 Rohingya were rescued off India and Indonesia, some claiming to have been beaten by Thai soldiers before being set adrift in the high seas.

Hundreds of the boat people are still believed to be missing at sea.

Abhisit has said authorities were dealing with the boat people in a humane way, but Britain on Tuesday joined the United Nations in expressing “concern” for the migrants’ welfare.

The foreign ministry statement said an estimated 20,000 illegal migrants were currently in Thailand and said several thousand arrive each year, calling the issue “a collective problem” for regional countries to address together.

Meanwhile Thai authorities detained a further 78 boat people from Myanmar who were found off Surin island in the south around midnight Monday, police said.

Related:
http://inthefield.blogs.cnn.com/2009/01/23/sc
andal-of-new-boat-people-damaging-thailand/

More Refugees Land in Thailand Amid Abuse, Human Rights Furor

Thailand’s Questionable Talk On Stopping Abuse of Refugees

http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiapcf
/01/27/thailand.refugees/index.html

Asian New Year Down in Many Countries Due To Economy

January 25, 2009

Our Vietnamese-American New Year got off to a slow start I thought and our pastor said to enjoy God’s blessings.

In years past, we just had fun!

Then a friend suggested the economy had depress the New Year’s start globally, which is undoubtedly true….

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From Czech News, Czech Republic

“They say the year of the water buffalo will not be good. People who are born this year will have to work hard,” Mr. Hai says worryingly in a Vietnamese restaurant Little Hanoi in Prague’s outskirts where a celebration of New Year is about to begin.

The Vietnamese zodiac calls 2009 the year of the water buffalo and the Czech Vietnamese community is likely to experience a bad year, not only because of the water buffalo.

Hard Times

Lots of food and fun festivities welcome the Vietnamese Lunar New Year. This time Prague’s Vietnamese community invited Czech journalists to celebrate New Year with them and thus discover the charms of Vietnam’s most popular holiday called Tet.
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The relaxed atmosphere of the Tet celebration was however occasionally interrupted by a mention of the economic downturn that has mercilessly hit the world, including the Czech Republic.

“Why don’t you wish this economic crisis is over soon,” says one of the Vietnamese organizers to a guest who is about to say his wish to a Vietnamese-sign painter.

It is understood by everybody present in the room why the guest should wish the end of the economic crisis. The facts are well known – Czech factories are massively sacking employees and foreign workers are the first ones to lose their jobs.

As soon as their work contracts are terminated, jobless foreigners must return home but often find themselves in a difficult situation, not having any money to buy a ticket. According to humanitarian organizations, hundreds if not thousands of Vietnamese happen to be in a such desperate situation.
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“Laying off people is a great problem. We are trying to find some kind of solution for these people, get them a new working permit and we have been appealling to Czech companies to give them at least temporary jobs,” says Le Minh Cau, vice-president of the Vietnamese Association in the Czech Republic.
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According to Marcel Winter, the chairman of the Czech Vietnamese Society, the Vietnamese markets that are so abundant in every Czech town are expected to disappear in about three years as a consequence of the global economic meltdown.

“We conducted a survey and our profits dropped down to half in the past year. It is because of the financial crisis,” representative of Asia Dragon Bazar Hong Nguyen said for Aktuálně.cz not long ago. “The truth is nobody really knows what is going to happen,” he added.
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In January a Czech green card program kicked off, which allows guest workers to get working permits in the country but has been limited to 12 non-EU countries by the Interior Ministry. Vietnam was excluded over alleged security risks. The only Asian countries included in the list are Japan and South Korea.
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The Vietnamese community is the third largest immigrant group in the Czech Republic and Vietnam is also among the 9 priority countries of Czech development aid.
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The Czech Republic is the only country in the world that has been providing a continuous humanitarian or development aid since 1945. The first Vietnamese came to the country in 1950 and the prolific cooperation went on until 1989 when the communist government was toppled.

Vietnam: Bad Omen Opens New Year

January 25, 2009

One year ago, a wicked snow storm with cold and ice kept millions of Chinese from reaching home for the start of theLunar New Year.  This was considered an “unlucky” omen that could potentially marr the entire year.  Now Vietnam is experiecing grief instead of joy after a ferry accident claimed several lives at the start of the new Year….

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Associated Press
“It’s a tragedy for the province,” said Phan Lam Phuong, the governor of Quang Binh. “It should have been time to celebrate the Lunar New Year.”

He said the provincial government has decided to cancel a Lunar New Year fireworks show.
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A small ferry overloaded with passengers sank in central Vietnam on Sunday, killing at least 40 people including seven girls and 27 women.

The 40 bodies, including those of three pregnant women, were recovered from the Gianh river in Quang Binh province, about 315 miles south of Hanoi, provincial police chief Phan Thanh Ha said.

Rescuers were still searching for two others missing, he said. Thirty-six passengers were rescued.

Ha said they initially though another four people were missing, but that turned out not be the case.

“This is one of the worst ferry accidents in Vietnam,” Ha said.

An initial investigation showed the boat was overloaded with nearly 80 people, even though it was designed to carry 12, he said.

Recipes for Asian New Year Good For Everyone

January 24, 2009

Unlike traditional British end-of-year celebrations, where the food plays second fiddle to a festive booze-up, the Chinese celebrate in a different fashion. In communities all round the world the Chinese mark their new year with two weeks of celebrations, in which everybody visits family and friends and they share meals together. Most celebrate with a big banquet that consists of 10-15 courses and delicacies that you wouldn’t find in your average Chinese restaurant.

 The Independent (UK) 

Steamed scallops with black bean sauce 

JSteamed scallops with black bean sauce.  Photo by Jason Lowe

As each course is served, the host respectfully offers the choice pieces to the honoured guest or the eldest, and the fish course is traditionally served last so that some will remain on the table to see the new year in. This year, the Year of the Ox or Buffalo (a sign that symbolises prosperity through hard work), begins on Monday. You can join in the celebrations by having a dim-sum lunch in your nearest Chinatown, or cook up a feast for your friends with the recipes below….

Read the rest and get the recipes:
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-d
rink/features/feast-days-mark-hix-celebrates-chin
ese-new-year-in-style-1488477.html

New Year In Asia: Time for Great Food!

January 24, 2009

News of the impending Chinese Lunar New Year or “Tet,” the aroma of my Mother-in-Law’s fresh hot “heart of beast” soup, plus a news story about the Hanoi Zoo and a brief encounter with a friendly black dog reminded me today that it is almost that magical time of year: the celebration of great eating.

No, not “Super Bowl Sunday.”

TET!

My wife’s Mom cooks up many a great delicacy and today it was “heart of beast” soup. I call it this because I have no idea where the heart comes from.

And I mean I don’t know what animal or what vendor.

And I don’t want to know. Like many things Asian, it is made in a mysterious way and it is enough to know that it is no good without a lot of heart…

The BBC News reported today that the Hanoi Zoo had been caught illegally trading in rare animal parts. Carcasses of tigers, elephants and other creatures of God’s good earth had been discovered in strange places. Some parts had been sold or “trafficked.” Some were wrapped in the freezer. An Asian friend said, “Some great eating there.”

Sumatran tiger, file image 

Tigers are used in traditional Asian medicines

Elephant?

I said I didn’t want to know….

Finally, we met a friendly black dog today. We admired her and petted her. Her owner said, “Ten years old. And you know what they say in China? The best dog is black dog.”

I had a feeling this remark came from a chef and not a vet or a dog trainer.

But I didn’t ask.

Related:

I Have Eaten A Pack of Dogs and a Flock of Crow But “Hold the Penis”

How about a nice hot bowl of horse meat and noodle during the Super Bowl?

Internet Limits on Sex, Porn Used to Mask Limits on Freedom, Human Rights?

January 10, 2009

The government of China has recently launched a major crackdown on Internet sites and search engines that it does not condone.

China says it “decided to launch a nationwide campaign to clean up a vulgar current on the Internet and named and exposed a large number of violating public morality and harming the physical and mental health of youth and young people.”

But China has, in the past, revoked the rights of  Internet providers to serve the public in China, or has restricted content, for politicial reasons often seen as a violation of free speech.

Related:
Internet: Do You Really Believe China Cares About Porn, Public Morality?

Activists say China and Vietnam, in particular, hide corruption, human rights abuses and pro-democracy information from the public — using anti-porn as a justification.  These actvisits say the government actions are blatant censorship and violations of free speech.

In the recent crackdown in China, Google, MSN, Baidu and dozens of search engines and providers were forced to delete content and apologize to the Chinese government.

art.hacker1.cnn.jpg 

The action comes in a year of social turmoil due to the economy, mass migration of the unemployed, fear of economic unrest and several anniversaries that may spark unrest within China.

This is the 20th year since the bloody crackdown on pro-democracy protests in Tiananmen Square in 1989.

Analysts see this year as a potential trouble point for China’s Communist government.

But Rebecca MacKinnon, co-founder of Global Voices, an assistant professor of journalism at Hong Kong University, a former CNN correspondent and an observer of China and the Internet, recently discussed with CNN the move by Beijing.  She believes the Internet trend in China is part of a larger global move….

By John E. Carey
Wakefield Chapel, Virginia

Tianasquare.jpg
Tiananmen Square in 1989.

Read the CNN report:
http://edition.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asia
pcf/01/10/china.internet/index.html

Related:
China widens “vulgar” online crackdown
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Google, Baidu Other Internet Companies Apologize to China To Regain Business

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The Associated Press reported on January 9, 2009:

China on Friday expanded its Internet cleanup campaign, which had ostensibly been aimed at cracking down on pornography, to shut down a blog-hosting site popular with activists, www.bullog.cn. The site’s founder, Luo Yonghao, said he was notified by the Beijing Communications Administration that the site “contained harmful comments on current affairs and therefore will be closed.”

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Tim Johnson of the McClatchy Newspapers reported on this on January 9, 2009:

Zhang-ziyi
For one thing, the internet is abuzz with postings and photos of young Chinese actress Zhang Ziyi cavorting on a beach in the Caribbean with her fiancé. (Sorry, I’ll offer no links, just the photo you see of her here.) China Daily this morning calls the hubbub over the photos “an instant online carnival of voyeurism.”

Zhang, who was in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, was voted China’s most beautiful actress last month.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/mcb_china/20090109/wl_m
cb_china/china200901crackingdown
oninternetlewdnesshtml

EdisonChen.JPG
Chinese Boy Toy Edison Chen

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Psst: People, as noted by China and Vietnam, waste a lot of time on the Internet:
China: Porn King Almost Got The Best Of Barack Obama

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Other nations have also taken actions against a totally free Internet recently.  The Associated Press reported on December 27, 2008:

A proposed Internet filter dubbed the “Great Aussie Firewall” is promising to make Australia one of the strictest Internet regulators among democratic countries.

Consumers, civil-rights activists, engineers, Internet providers and politicians from opposition parties are among the critics of a mandatory Internet filter that would block at least 1,300 Web sites prohibited by the government — mostly child pornography, excessive violence, instructions in crime or drug use and advocacy of terrorism.

Hundreds protested in state capitals earlier this month.

“This is obviously censorship,” said Justin Pearson Smith, 29, organizer of protests in Melbourne and an officer of one of a dozen Facebook groups against the filter.

Read the rest:
 Australia Moves to Censor Internet

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Vietnam has for a long time tried to rein in the Internet and bloggers.  On December 24, The Associated Press reported:

Vietnam has approved new regulations banning bloggers from discussing subjects the government deems sensitive or inappropriate and requiring them to limit their writings to personal issues.

The rules ban any posts that undermine national security, incite violence or crime, disclose state secrets, or include inaccurate information that could damage the reputation of individuals and organizations, according to a copy of the regulations obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press.

Read the rest:
Vietnam imposes new blogging restrictions

Related:
 Vietnam: Editors of Leading Anti-Corruption Newspapers Removed
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 Media Censorship, Criminalization of Free Press In Vietnam Needs Action

South Korean Arrested, Used Internet to Criticize Government

Anti-Freedom?, Anti-Porn, Baidu, Chinese, Google, Internet, Le Hoang, MSN, Nguyen Cong Khe, Nguyen Van Hai, Nguyen Viet Chien, Thanh Nien, Tiananmen Square, Tuoi Tre, Vietnam, Vietnamese, activists, anti-corruption, australia, censorship, china, corruption, free media, free press, free speech, freedom, human rights, news, politics, porn, pornagraphy, pro-democracy, sex, sexual

Media Censorship, Criminalization of Free Press In Vietnam Needs Action

January 9, 2009

US-based group Human Rights Watch (HRW) called Friday on the World Bank and donor nations to Vietnam to press the communist government to stop criminalising journalists and allow a free media.

The group pointed to the recent jailings of reporters and bloggers and the dismissals of two newspaper editors as the latest examples in “a series of measures by the Vietnamese government to stifle criticism and dissent.”

AFP

A newspaper vendor in Hanoi. US-based group Human Rights Watch ... 
A newspaper vendor in Hanoi. US-based group Human Rights Watch (HRW) called Friday on the World Bank and donor nations to Vietnam to press the communist government to stop criminalising journalists and allow a free media(AFP/File/Hoang Dinh Nam)

“Vietnam is one of the few countries where people can be locked up on charges of ‘abusing democratic freedoms’,” said HRW Asia director Brad Adams.

“Vietnam’s donors should continue to insist that the government stop its criminalization of peaceful expression.”

Authorities have targeted the Thanh Nien (Young People) and Tuoi Tre (Youth) dailies, which helped uncover a major graft scandal in which officials squandered money from projects partially financed by Japan and the World Bank.

“The World Bank and Japan should come to the defence of these investigative reporters and their editors,” said Adams.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20090109/wl_asia_af
p/vietnammediarightshrwworldbank_newsmlmmd

Human Trafficking For Sex In The U.S.

January 9, 2009
She testifies in federal court how a group of immigrants duped her into coming to the U.S., forced her to sell herself and kept her captive.
By Scott Glover
Los Angeles Times
January 9, 2009
When Sandra agreed to make the perilous trek from her native Guatemala to the United States in 2006, she said, she was lured by the prospect of a job as a housekeeper that would enable her to send money to her impoverished family back home.

Her father had a hernia that prevented him from working, and money was so tight that she and her 12 siblings sometimes didn’t have shoes or enough to eat, the young woman testified Thursday in federal court in Los Angeles.

But not long after Sandra was delivered to L.A. by human-smuggling “coyotes,” she learned that the job awaiting her had nothing to do with cleaning houses.

Instead, she said, she was told that she would have to “lay with men.”

“Did you understand you were going to be working as a prostitute?” asked Assistant U.S. Atty. Cheryl Murphy.

“I did not know what that word was,” Sandra responded through a Spanish-language translator. “Now I do.”

Related:
Vietnam’s Government Going Into Wife Selling Business?
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Asian Human Trafficking, Torture and Sex Trade

Read the rest:
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-sext
raffic9-2009jan09,0,133445.story

Vietnam’s Government Going Into Wife Selling Business?

January 8, 2009

Vietnam says it is planning to set up an official matchmaking agency to arrange marriages between Vietnamese women and foreign men.

The authorities say they want to regulate the sector, which they say is currently run by illegal groups.

Police have targeted events in recent years where dozens of women from poor backgrounds, seeking a better life, are paraded before potential suitors.

The men are often on short “marriage holidays” from South Korea and Taiwan.

BBC

Correspondents say that overseas marriage is seen by some women in Vietnam as a route out of poverty and the practice is widespread in some rural areas.

But many women fall foul of unscrupulous brokers and are sold into prostitution, while others are forced into marriages they do not want.

Vietnamese officials have now been told to make plans for a state-controlled matchmaking firm based in Ho Chi Minh City.

Read the rest from the BBC:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7817818.stm

Related:
Human Trafficking For Sex In The U.S.