Archive for the ‘websites’ Category

China Extends War on Free Speech Hidden by Fight Against Porn into Cell Phones

January 21, 2009

China has extended a crackdown on electronic porn to the country’s mobile phones, after shutting down 1,250 websites because of their explicit content, the official Xinhua agency said Wednesday.

“We will incorporate ‘lewd’ messages spread via mobile phones into the crackdown,” the report quoted a joint notice from the Ministry of Public Security, the Ministry of Culture and five other government offices saying.

China promised last week that the campaign, which was launched in early January, will be no “flash in the pan.”

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Over 40 people have been detained for disseminating porn on the Internet, and over 3 million “items of online information” have been deleted, the report said.

Google, Baidu and other major websites have also been given a public dressing down for not being quick enough to wipe out targeted content, and outspoken blogging portals shut down for posting “politically harmful information.”

The Internet crackdown has been described by analysts as another step in the Communist Party‘s battle to stifle dissent in a year of sensitive anniversaries, including the 20th anniversary of the government’s bloody crackdown on the pro-democracy Tiananmen Square protests in 1989.

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Tiananmen Square in 1989.

(Reporting by Emma Graham-Harrison; Editing by Sanjeev Miglani for Reuters)

Internet: Do You Really Believe China Cares About Porn, Public Morality?

China targets big websites in Internet crackdown

January 5, 2009

China has launched a crackdown against major websites that officials accused of threatening morals by spreading pornography and vulgarity, including the dominant search engines Google and Baidu.

Reuters

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China’s Ministry of Public Security and six other government agencies announced the campaign at a meeting on Monday, state television reported, showing officials hauling digital equipment away from one unidentified office.

The meeting “decided to launch a nationwide campaign to clean up a vulgar current on the Internet and named and exposed a large number of violating public morality and harming the physical and mental health of youth and young people,” the report said.

The 19 Internet operators and websites named had failed to swiftly cut “vulgar” content and had not heeded warnings from censors, it said.

Baidu dominates the Chinese web search and advertising market with an estimated two-thirds of the audience. Google Inc, the global market leader, is a distant number two in China.

Read the rest:
http://tech.yahoo.com/news/nm/20090
105/wr_nm/us_china_internet_3

Tis the Season for Porn?

December 21, 2008

I will be called names for writing this column. It always happens. Raise the issue of the pornification of the culture and its fanatical devotees will come gunning for you. If they hope to be intimidating, they’ve forgotten what delete keys are for.

It’s Christmastime and the Fox News Channel, the most conservative of the major media outlets, is running an ad for PajamaGrams, “the only gift guaranteed to get your wife or girlfriend to take her clothes off.” The ads feature soft porn images of women disrobing and tossing slips and bras to the floor. The ads run at all times of the day and night. Thus do we usher in the season supposedly devoted to the Prince of Peace and the Festival of Lights.

We all know how far the pornification has gotten. A mainstream movie apparently treats the subject as cute and fun (“Zack and Miri Make a Porno“) and it runs at the multiplex next to “Four Christmases” and “Madagascar.” Hotels offer pornographic movies and omit the titles from the final bill. Victoria’s Secret graces every mall — and its windows resemble the red light district of Amsterdam. Viagra and its imitators are hawked ceaselessly. Television, music videos, and supermarket checkout magazines contain the kinds of suggestive words and images that would once have been labeled soft porn.

Women work in the red light district, Amsterdam (file pic)
Amsterdam

We know this. But what is less well understood is the world of hard-core porn that was once the province of dingy “adults only” stores in the harsher parts of town but is now available to everyone at the click of a mouse.

Last week the Witherspoon Institute (http://www.winst.org) convened a conference on pornography at Princeton University and invited scholars from a variety of fields to contribute. The statistics are mind-numbing. Pamela Paul, author of “Pornified,” reported that “Americans rent upwards of 800 million pornographic videos and DVDs per year. About one in five rented videos is porn. … Men look at pornography online more than they look at any other subject. And 66 percent of 18-34 year old men visit a pornographic site every month.”
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By Mona Charin

Related:
 Holiday sex: Christmas season is peak for mating

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/uc/20081219/cm_uc_crmchx/
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China defends censoring websites that break rules

December 16, 2008

China defended Tuesday the blocking of websites it said violated Chinese law and urged Internet companies to respect its legal system.

“The Chinese government conducts necessary management over the Internet. It is the same with other nations,” foreign ministry spokesman Liu Jianchao told journalists.

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Chinese journalists, Reporters Without Borders and Tibetan human rights groups all say China censors the internet too much…

“You cannot deny, some websites actually contain content that violates China’s laws.”

Liu cited websites that maintain that Taiwan is an independent nation separate from China, a view that violates China’s anti-secession law, he said.

“I hope that websites can practise self-restraint and not do things that violate China’s law,” he said.
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AFP

Liu was responding to questions on why websites belonging to the BBC, the Voice of America and Reporters Without Borders appeared to be blocked in China after they were made accessible during the Beijing Olympics.

Liu did not answer those questions, nor would he comment on the legal process leading up to the blocking of any particular website.

China exercises strict control over the Internet, blocking sites linked to Chinese dissidents, the outlawed Falun Gong spiritual movement, the Tibetan government-in-exile and those with information on the 1989 Tiananmen massacre.

Its system of Internet censorship has become known as the “Great Firewall of China” due to the large number of websites that are inaccessible from inside the country.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081216/tc_afp/chin
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Pentagon Says “Secure” Internet System Was Subject of Cyber Attack

December 11, 2008

The Pentagon’s primary secure internet information system has become the subject of a cyber attack.

Experts say the trouble originated in Afghanistan when an outside Internet Service provider (ISP) was hired to support the U.S. troops in Afghanistan.  The ISP turned out to be a front company for former Russian KGB agents.

Fox news is reporting that an external drive like a “thumb drive” was most probably used to penetrate the U.S. system.  U.S. experts are working to determine the full nature of the trouble.

External drives are no loger allowed in DoD systems, we are told.

Pete Hoekstra, a Republican member of the House Intelligence Committee, says even our most secure computer systems are “not secure enough.”

The Department of Defense group evaluating the situation is unsure if Russia is behind the intrusion or another entity used the ISP front company.

“Denial of service” was the first indication of trouble for the Pentagon system.

Experts say that Russia launched a major “Denial of Service” campaign prior to and during the attack on Georgia and South Ossetia last August.  The websites impacted then included the site of Georgia’s President Mikheil Saakashvili.
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John E. Carey
Peace and Freedom

Related:
 U.S. “Highly Vulnerable” To Cyber attack, Especially Military, Government

 

The official website of Mikheil Saakashvili, the Georgian President

The official website of Mikheil Saakashvili, the Georgian President, was under external control from shortly before Russia’s armed intervention last August until the end of hostilities.